The Civic Has Boost! Performance Intake R&D, Part 2: Prototype Development

We are moving along with the intake project! Last time, we talked about the stock system and our goals for this project. Now, we will show you our process for assembling a prototype that we can test and analyze results from. Let’s jump right in!

Once our engineers finalize a design, the proposed idea gets modeled in 3D modeling software. The next step is to make the idea a physical reality. We have an awesome machine called a waterjet that can cut almost anything with pinpoint accuracy using a mixture of high pressure water and abrasive material. We upload our design to the waterjet through computer software, “telling” it exactly what we want to cut. The machine takes care of the rest! We just sit back and watch as our prototype gets crafted out of a big sheet of any metal we place inside the machine – in this case, steel.

Prototype 2016 Honda Civic parts ready for the waterjet process
Prototype 2016 Honda Civic parts ready for the waterjet process
Prototype 2016 Honda Civic parts in the waterjet process
Prototype 2016 Honda Civic parts in the waterjet process

Once the parts are ready, we pull them out of the sheet.

Prototype 2016 Honda Civic parts after the waterjet process
Prototype 2016 Honda Civic parts after the waterjet process

Next, we arrange the pieces, prepare them for assembly and weld them together to form the prototype.

Final cut pieces for the prototype 2016 Civic intake
Final cut pieces for the prototype 2016 Civic intake
Welding together the parts to the prototype 2016 Civic intake
Welding together the parts to the prototype 2016 Civic intake
Finished 2016 Civic intake prototype after welding
Finished 2016 Civic intake prototype after welding

Pay close attention to the image above. It shows how we plan to use the stock fresh air duct we discussed in the last post. The front of the box with the opening is where the filter will gather cool fresh air. We wanted to have an enclosed airbox while still retaining use of the fresh air that is guided into the duct. This will ensure that most of the hot air from the cramped engine space is directed away from the filter.

Prototype box fully assembled
Prototype box fully assembled
Prototype box fully assembled
Prototype box fully assembled

What’s Next?

2016 Civic ready for intake dyno tests
2016 Civic ready for intake dyno tests

We have a working prototype ready for dyno testing. Stay tuned for the next update to see our results and what our performance gains look like! As always, thanks for reading!

-Diamaan

2013+ Focus ST Performance Intake, Part 4: The Final Product

Check out our discounted Presale at the link below!

2013+ Ford Focus ST Performance Intake Presale Link

 

We have an update for our Focus ST intake project! Our first production sample has finally reached our R&D facility, and we have been able to test fit it onto a 2013 Ford Focus ST. Fitment was spot on, and we were able to get all the components properly snug into the car. We made some minor adjustments from our initial design and we included an awesome new feature that will help accommodate more Focus ST’s on the road, so let’s check it out!

It’s the Little Things

During the time we were updating our design, we discovered small differences between the stock 2013—2015 and the 2016+ Focus ST intakes. The 2013—2015 Focus ST’s have a screw type mass airflow (MAF) sensor that goes into the stock pipe. In the 2016+ model, however, the MAF sensor is replaced with an IAT sensor in the same location and it fits into a push-type clip housing. Many aftermarket intakes retain use of the stock accordion style boot that holds the sensor in place, — especially in for the 2016+ model. We were able to accommodate for that, which makes our kit more comprehensive. Let’s look at how we accomplished this.

Prototype Focus ST parts
Prototype Focus ST parts

As you can see, the adapters are different for each version of the stock Focus ST intake. In the above image, the adapter on the bottom right fits the 2013–2015 Focus STs, while the other adapter fits the 2016+ models. This adapter allows us to replace that stock accordion–style boot that many of our competitors neglect to replace because of the differences in fitment. See below for fitment on our pipe!

MAF adapter fitment for the 2016+ Focus ST
MAF adapter fitment for the 2016+ Focus ST

The image above shows how the adapter accommodates the IAT sensor in the 2016+ Focus ST. The image below shows the adapter for the sensors in the 2013—2015 Focus ST MAF. Both sensors are attached to our pipe using the same Allen bolt.

MAF adapter fitment for the 2013–2015 Focus ST
MAF adapter fitment for the 2013–2015 Focus ST

Let’s see how this fits on our prototype kit!

MAF adapter fitment for the 2013-2015 Focus ST
MAF adapter fitment for the 2013-2015 Focus ST

Since we were test fitting our kit onto a 2013 Focus ST, we had to use the corresponding adapter that fits for that model year. You can see in the image above that the fresh air inlets are the only stock Focus ST intake pieces in our kit. Let’s look at other components of the kit!

Prototype Focus ST parts
Prototype Focus ST parts
Prototype Focus ST parts
Prototype Focus ST parts
IMG_5204r
Prototype Focus ST parts

Here is a great shot of the entire kit!

Prototype Focus ST parts
Prototype kit all together!

What’s Next?

Now that we know everything fits nicely, we can get the wheels rolling on full scale production. This means we are ready to kick off our presale! During the live pre-sale, you can get this intake at a discounted price before it officially hits the market, so check back here for it!

In the meantime, enjoy this teaser of the kit fitted onto the car and stay tuned for more updates on Focus ST parts.

Prototype installed on the car
Prototype installed on the car

Thanks for reading!

-Diamaan

Check out our discounted Presale at the link below!

2013+ Ford Focus ST Performance Intake Presale Link

Turn Up the Volume! The Fiesta ST Cat-Back Exhaust Part 4: R&D Update

It has been quite a while since our last update, and we are glad to be wrapping up this project! One of the reasons for this delay is that, based on your feedback, we have decided to add a few more options for this exhaust system.

You might remember from a previous post, that our engineers enjoyed the louder sound of our non-resonated exhaust after having listened to both the resonated and non-resonated versions. Since there were no improvements in horsepower with either option, we based our decision to create the exhaust on sound only.

To refresh your memory, here are some photos of the resonated and non-resonated sections of the exhaust. Aside from this small difference, the rest of the exhaust layout is the same.

Fiesta ST parts testing
Fiesta ST parts testing
Fiesta ST parts testing
Fiesta ST parts testing
Fiesta ST exhaust
Fiesta ST exhaust

We have decided to release a resonated exhaust for those who want more noise from their Fiesta, but not quite as much as the non-resonated version. We know how much Fiesta ST owners enjoy customization, so not only do you get to choose a resonated or non-resonated exhaust, but you will also have several color options: polished, titanium, and black tips for the Fiesta ST exhaust. Stay tuned for more photos of the various tips, and happy customization everyone!

Coming Up!

The wait is over, it is pre-sale time! In the next few weeks we will be launching a discounted pre-sale for those who have been following our progress here on the forums. Keep an eye out for updates on this, and let us know what you think about our exhaust options!

Thanks for reading!

-Sara

Eliminating the Eyesore. Mishimoto 2016 Camaro Expansion Tank R&D, Part 2: 3D-Printed Prototype

Design work and refinement continue with our 2016 Camaro expansion tank. To verify fitment within the constraints of the engine bay, we’ve 3D printed a prototype in plastic to install on our test vehicle.

Check out a few shots of this prototype installed!

Prototype 2016 Camaro coolant expansion tank installed
Prototype 2016 Camaro coolant expansion tank installed

The image above shows the tank with a sight tube instead of a sight glass, which we used on our previous 3D models. We are experimenting with both designs to determine which is easier to read and which is going to provide the most durability. Let us know what you think!

Prototype 2016 Camaro coolant expansion tank installed
Prototype 2016 Camaro coolant expansion tank installed

Along with the mounting points, we also need to ensure that all the hose connection points are in the same location as the stock tank.

Prototype 2016 Camaro parts
Prototype 2016 Camaro parts

A few minor adjustments are needed on the design, but this first prototype fit quite well.

Coming Up – Functional Prototype

Now that we’ve made design adjustments, we can begin constructing our first functional prototype. Check back next time for a look at our aluminum expansion tank.

Keep an eye on our blog for updates on development of additional 2016 Camaro parts!

Thanks for reading!

-John

(I Can’t Get No) Low Oil Temps – 2016 Camaro SS Oil Cooler R&D, Part 1: Stock Review

Here at the Mishimoto R&D facility in New Castle, DE, we are hard at work designing 2016 Camaro parts, but we’ve been experiencing some pretty inconsistent weather lately. We’ve had brief glimpses of spring, but this past weekend has thrust us back into the sulk of the winter that we so naively thought was behind us. As one might imagine, we’re really looking forward to some sunshine and scorching summer weather! But do you know what is NOT looking forward to the heat?

You got it! The oil in your 2016 Camaro SS.

That’s right, folks, you needn’t fret anymore; Mishimoto has tasked our engineers with making you and your oil much more comfortable by kicking off the development process for a snazzy new 2016 Camaro oil cooler!  Our company is full of enthusiasts, and we understand how frustrating the fear of overheating can be when you have to pass on autocross or cut off those last few runs at the strip. Let’s take a quick look at what we’ve got going on from the factory before delving into how we can help to cool you down with some of our own 2016 Camaro parts.

stock1
Stock 2016 Camaro parts

The stock 2016 Camaro oil cooler setup is limited to a single liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger that is bolted onto the side of the engine just in front of the oil filter. Oil flows through the exchanger, and two coolant lines (supply and return) provide a steady flow of coolant, into which some of that heat is transferred. This unit functions most prominently as a means of cooling the oil, but also works inversely upon startup and for a short duration thereafter to help warm the oil temperature when the coolant’s temperature exceeds it.

front1
2016 Camaro Oil cooler

In order to bolster your Camaro’s ability to cool down its oil, we are going to be incorporating a 25-row liquid-to-air heat exchanger; this will work by transferring some of that thermal energy out of your engine oil and into the ambient air flowing through the exchanger. Our plans utilize an M22 sandwich plate that will sit snugly between the LT1’s engine block and the oil filter, and we will also supply an M22 adapter (aka, a center bolt) to keep everything where it needs to be. From the sandwich plate, an output line will transport your too-hot-to-party oil to the exchanger in the front of the car, and a return line will bring it on home to your LT1, cooled down, and where it belongs. (My 25-year old BMW still hasn’t figured out that the driveway is NOT where the oil belongs.)

In the front of the car, the heat exchanger sits nicely mounted just below the bumper support. Our engineers have come up with some clever metal brackets that mount to preexisting bolts, meaning that you will not have to drill holes into any of your 2016 Camaro parts. The horn needs to be moved slightly, but don’t start honking at me on the forums just yet, because we will also be providing a bracket to make that accommodation a snap!

engineer1
Installing prototype 2016 Camaro parts

Next time …

So all of this sounds great, but these 2016 Camaro parts are no good if they don’t actually cool your oil. Our 2016 Camaro oil cooler is currently undergoing rigorous testing to ensure that it meets our high standards. Next time, we’ll go over our collected data, and I’ll give you some insight into how our testing process works.

Until then, happy Camaro-ing and enjoy the spring time!

-Gardiner

An inside look at the engineering of Mishimoto products.

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