Test truck on dynamometer

Mishimoto 2010–2012 Dodge 6.7L Cummins Intercooler, Part 1: Project Introduction

Mishimoto joined the diesel world around 16 months ago, and since that time we have been providing unmatched cooling protection and performance for Powerstroke, Cummins, and Duramax engines. Using our knowledge and experience in the development of products for sport compact and European vehicles, our team is able to design, enhance, test, and manufacture a variety of beneficial components for your truck. We already carry a slew of products for Dodge Cummins trucks, including the following:

  • Aluminum Radiators, 1989–2009
  • Performance Intercoolers, 2003–2009
  • Silicone Radiator Hose Kits, 1994–2010
  • Factory-Fit Silicone Intercooler Boot Kits, 1994–2012
  • Aluminum Intercooler Pipe and Boot Kits, 2003–2009

We currently carry a very full product line for the third-generation Cummins. Once we had that finalized, it was time to turn our attention toward the fourth generation, starting with the 2010–2012 model. Our initial target would be development of a radiator and intercooler. This series of posts will cover our development of the intercooler.

Before jumping into development, we first need to evaluate the features of the factory cooler to determine if this truck would benefit from an upgraded intercooler. To do so, we contacted a few local folks and located a test vehicle fairly quickly. A big thank you to the owner of this truck for all of his assistance in the development process. Check out a few shots!

Test truck on dynamometer
Test truck on dynamometer

As you can see, Jason is inspecting the tires for any damage prior to running this truck on our Dynojet.

Test 6.7L Cummins engine bay
Test 6.7L Cummins engine bay

Once we had the truck in the shop, we began removing front-end components so we could access the intercooler and collect a few data points regarding its size, fitment, and location. After removing a few components, we were finally down to the cooler.

Factory 6.7L Cummins intercooler
Factory 6.7L Cummins intercooler
Factory 6.7L Cummins intercooler
Factory 6.7L Cummins intercooler

At this point we had a general impression of what the factory cooler offered. One positive feature was the cast aluminum end tanks, which are welded to the core. This feature is rare on modern vehicles, as most utilize a plastic end tank that is crimped to the core and seals on a rubber gasket. The factory tanks are quite robust. However, the factory core is a tube-and-fin design, which will be less efficient than the heavy duty bar-and-plate core we intend to use with our intercooler. Additionally, we found a few spots where we can smooth out the tanks to increase airflow. As with most of our intercooler projects, we will be increasing the core thickness to provide improved cooling over the factory unit and to support trucks with greater power.

Now that we had some basic information regarding the factory intercooler project, we could create a simple objective list to ensure we are targeting the needs of our customers appropriately.

Project Objectives

  1. Enlarge core as much as possible for improved flow and heat-transfer characteristics.
  2. Use bar-and-plate core for improved efficiency.
  3. Improve flow of end tanks.
  4. Must fit into place just like the OEM and require no vehicle modification.
  5. Collect real-world cooling efficiency data compared to the factory core.

Now, let’s go into more detail about the specifics of these goals!

Bigger is Better

The general perception of heat-exchanger efficiency is that a bigger core is better than a smaller unit. While this isn’t the final deciding factor for efficiency, a larger core is certainly a big benefit for transferring heat. The more volume we have and more space for fins, the more heat transfer we can promote, which will result in lower air temperatures. Our team will be developing the largest core possible while still retaining factory-like fitment.

Core Value

An efficient core is invaluable for the proper functioning of a heat exchanger and is the primary factor for efficient heat transfer. As mentioned above, we would be replacing the factory tube-and-fin core with a more robust bar-and-plate unit. Not only will the bar-and-plate core be more resilient to damage from road debris, but it will also be more efficient at transferring heat. The only downside we have found with the use of a bar-and-plate core is weight. This core is heavier than the tube cooler, and there is no way around this. Our hope is that the improvements in cooling efficiency will offset the increased weight. These trucks are already quite heavy, so adding 10–15 lb should not be noticeable at all. By reducing air charge temperatures, your engine will have a more explosive fuel/air mixture and will also see a reduction in EGTs. For modified trucks, EGT reduction is extremely important for improving the reliability and safety of several vital engine components.

Airflow

Airflow is also key for improving performance. If we can improve flow through the tanks and core, we can free up some restrictions. Less restrictions on the intake or exhaust of a diesel engine has also proven to reduce EGTs. If we are able to design a smooth end tank, turbulence will be reduced and the overall efficiency of the CAC system will be improved. We will be putting our design through CFD software analysis to ensure that what we design flows better than the factory unit.

Fitment

Even though we plan on redesigning the end tanks and expanding the core size, we still intend for this product to be a bolt-on upgrade. These trucks are still reasonably new, so we are sure that most owners are not interested in taking a sawzall or cutoff wheel to their core support. We will be designing our intercooler using dimensions from the engine bay and the factory intercooler to ensure everything fits perfectly. Once we have a functioning prototype, we will be test fitting this unit to confirm fitment. The Mishimoto intercooler will function with all factory equipment as well.

What will it do for my truck?

This is the primary question for anyone investigating the addition of a new performance part for their truck. What impact is this going to have for my truck? Will I be able to feel a difference? We completely understand this logic. Spending your hard-earned money on truck parts should show you a definite improvement. To prove that our intercooler is a worthy and essential upgrade, we will be testing its impact on inlet temperatures and then compare the results to the factory cooler. Our real-world testing data will serve to educate our potential customers regarding about what our products can do for them.

Now that we had the project guidelines outlined, we could move forward with the development process. Check back with us next time as we continue evaluating the factory intercooler and begin developing our prototype design.

Mishimoto prototype intercooler internal fins

Mishimoto Subaru WRX/STi Front-Mount Intercooler Kit, Part 3: Intercooler Prototype Introduction and Test Fitting

Time to take a quick look at our cooler and see how it fits with our test vehicles. First, a quick overview of the cooler itself. Check out our first prototype!

Mishimoto prototype intercooler
Mishimoto prototype intercooler
Mishimoto prototype intercooler
Mishimoto prototype intercooler

Alright, so here we have our raw prototype. Do note that this unit is a raw component, meaning it has no paint or powder-coat finish. The size of this cooler is extremely impressive, and our goal was to design a core length that would span as much of the front grille area as possible. The more airflow we have moving through the fins, the greater the heat transfer capability. Here are a few basic features of the prototype.

Cast End Tanks

As you can see, we have selected to manufacture these coolers with cast aluminum end tanks as opposed to a welded sheet metal tank. Why? The cast tanks provide a few benefits for us. First, airflow is improved. Because of the smooth internals of a cast tank, we can really take advantage of our CFD software to ensure that we are obtaining extremely smooth airflow. Any turbulence will result in a decrease in performance. The cast tanks also provide improved robustness and durability compared to a cut-and-weld tank. We build our products to handle anything your vehicle can throw at them, and this cooler is no different. A few of our other intercoolers with cast tanks have been proven to withstand 125 psi without issue. A third reason is aesthetics. A nicely designed cast end tank is far more appealing than a welded unit.

Bar-and-Plate Core

As with most of our intercoolers, we designed a very efficient bar-and-plate core which is superior to the optional tube-and-fin design. A bar-and-plate core provides improved resistance against heat soak and is also a more robust core, meaning it can manage damage from road debris much better. The key with the bar-and-plate core is heat transfer, which is greatly improved over the tube design. The only downfall of the bar-and-plate core is weight, which is greater than the lightweight tube design. This is a cost we are willing to pay for the improvements in cooling efficiency.

Large Volume Core

The more volume we can pack into this cooler, the greater the efficiency we can obtain, and the higher the power levels we can support. Our goal with sizing this core was very strategic. We wanted the entire grille to be filled with core in order to provide the greatest airflow possible. Check out the specs of the core below!

Length: 28”

Height: 8”

Depth: 3.5”

Dense External and Internal Fin Composition

Dense fin composition is a big part of the reason we have had so much success with our intercoolers. By increasing the number of fins in a cooler, we are able to increase the heat transfer contact points. More contact points result in lower temperatures and better efficiencies for our coolers. This particular intercooler feature a very dense core for both external and internal fins. We are using a short fin so we can fit as many rows as possible. Check out the shots below showing our core!

Mishimoto prototype intercooler external fins
Mishimoto prototype intercooler external fins
Mishimoto prototype intercooler internal fins
Mishimoto prototype intercooler internal fins

Now that we had evaluated our prototype unit and checked its dimensions with our drawings to ensure accuracy, it was time to bolt this guy onto a few vehicles to check/verify fitment.

First, we started with our 03 WRX wagon, mainly because it was already in the shop and we had easy access. This cooler looks pretty stout behind the bumper, check it out!

Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Bugeye
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Bugeye
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Bugeye
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Bugeye

Next we threw this kit on the Hawkeye test vehicle. So far everything was bolting up perfectly with only minor trimming required on the back of the bumper. Take a look!

Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Hawkeye
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Hawkeye
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Hawkeye
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Hawkeye
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Hawkeye
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on Hawkeye

Next up was the GR chassis! Check out this cooler fitted up to our WRX test vehicle first!

Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR WRX
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR WRX

And finally we bolted this cooler to our 2010 STi!

Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI
Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI

And a shot from underneath shows the clearance this cooler has between the bumper and radiator support.

Mishimoto prototype intercooler fitment on GR STI
Mishimoto prototype intercooler fitment on GR STI

Success! This intercooler design functions as designed, with all front core supports and bumpers for all 02-14 Subaru WRX and STi models. We do require that the bumpers be trimmed slightly and fog lamp usage will not be possible due to our core size. This is one sacrifice we had to make on our quest for optimal performance. Now we would need to fabricate several different pipe sets for each particular model.

Check back with us next time for some pipe fabrication shots! Thanks for following along.

E36 M3 test vehicle on dyno

Mishimoto BMW E30/E36 X-Line Radiator, Part 1: Product Introduction

Mishimoto is well known for providing innovative products for vehicles new and old. Our last few months have been dedicated to product development for the new 2015 Subaru WRX, which features a vast amount of changes from the previous generation. Along with these projects, we decided to go back to an older chassis and develop a brand new product for the E30/E36 BMW. We are huge BMW enthusiasts here, myself included, and we have found a gap in the radiator options for the late model E30 and E36 models. We have had great success with our current performance aluminum radiator for the E36. Our current offering is a perfect option for those who need an upgrade in the reliability department. The factory radiator is extremely prone to failure, specifically cracking end tanks and separation between the core and tank seal. By developing a full aluminum design, we quickly became a favorite as a great replacement option. This radiator also features an efficient core design and a slight increase in thickness. These two features will provide an improvement in heat transfer and will aid to reduce fluid temperatures and improve heat dissipation.

A great deal of our consumers have identified this radiator as being very effective for street driving and occasional track use. That being said, we have had several requests for a track specific radiator that was thicker, more efficient, and less expensive than the other “thick” radiator options on the market. We answered these calls and decided to move forward with developing a larger radiator. Now, this is not as simple as expanding our current radiator. We would need to gather data from the vehicle regarding fitment. Our engineering team would then need to develop a prototype unit and test it to ensure our design was in-line with the project goals. Speaking of goals, prior to any project we outline a set of objectives for our team to follow. This ensures that the product we end up with is exactly what the enthusiast world needs. Check out our project plans below!

Project Objectives

  1. Core must be as thick as possible while still retaining the factory mechanical fan
  2. Must be direct-fit for the 88-99 BMW E30/E36 vehicles with a 6-cylinder engine
  3. Must provide proven temperature benefits compared to the stock radiator
  4. Incorporate dense core composition for improved heat transfer

As usual, we will now break down these goals for a quick discussion of each.

Make it Big

One of our primary goals for this project is going to be increasing the core size of the radiator. Yes, core thickness is not the only determining factor of heat transfer and overall efficiency. By providing a thick core, we can utilize more fin and cooling tube surface area to promote a greater exchange of heat. So the added thickness does help us out, but it must be paired with a well-designed core. We will cover more on the core below. We also have to be careful about increasing the size of this radiator core. We realize that some of our customers will still want to utilize their mechanical fan. The factory mechanical provides a reasonably high airflow output, although it can be just as failure prone as the stock radiator. Despite this, we want our radiator to fit with the stock mechanical fan as well as an electrical conversion setup.

We are aware of some engine shifting possibilities if the factory engine/transmission mounts are worn. A great deal of movement can turn a fun track day into a nightmare of radiator core destruction and a nice puddle of coolant. Because we are enlarging this radiator both frontward and rearward, we highly recommend you ensure that your motor mounts are in good shape prior to installing our product. We will be providing some clearance leeway between the fan and radiator, but the potential for contact is certainly a possibility if your mounts have too much movement. Specs for the core sizing of the stock, Mishimoto and potential size of our new radiator are listed below.

Stock Radiator Thickness: 34mm 1 row

Mishimoto Radiator Thickness: 40mm 2 row

Mishimoto X-Line Radiator Thickness: 55+mm 2 row (projected)

Fitment

A goal with any of our projects is always going to be flawless fitment. Our current E36 radiator fits perfectly in both the 36 and 30 chassis. As long as we emulate all mounting points on our new design, we should have similar fitment. Although these vehicles are getting older, we understand that no one would prefer to modify their vehicle by cutting or trimming unless it results in some huge benefit. For this particular radiator, we will not be cutting or trimming any components in the engine bay. Our hope is that this product fits into position just like the stock unit.

Testing…Testing

Testing data has been instrumental in our current product development process. Our engineering facility features a Dynojet, fabrication tools, and PLX data collection sensors. All of this equipment allows our team to fully test all of our products to ensure they are performing to our standards prior to releasing them to the world. For this particular radiator, we will be evaluating inlet and outlet fluid temperatures to check core efficiency compared to the stock radiator. This will provide our customers with real-world data that they can use to determine if this product is something their vehicle can benefit from. Check our later posts for testing results!

Core Fin Density

Core thickness means nothing unless you pair that with a well-designed core. The two primary components are the cooling tubes and the cooling fins. Adding capacity can be completed by having a greater number of cooling tubes. To pack more cooling tubes into our radiator, we will be designing a very short fin height. This will decrease the height of each row, allowing us to stuff more tubes and fins into the same area. By doing so, we can also fit a greater number of fins into each row. The cooling fins cause heat transfer from the cooling tubes to the airflow passing through the core. A greater number of fins will provide greater heat transfer and have a greater impact on lowering fluid temperatures. This will have just as much of an impact on efficiency as the increase in core thickness.

 

Now that we had our goals setup, we could move forward with the first stages of development. This includes collecting data points from a factory radiator and the engine bay of an E36. Luckily, our talented videographer drives an E36 M, so it would be as simple as stealing the keys from his desk and pulling it into the shop. Check out a shot of our test vehicle!

E36 M3 test vehicle on dyno
E36 M3 test vehicle on dyno

Once we had the dimensional information collected, our engineering team began modeling our radiator prototype in Solidworks. Check out the renderings produced below!

Mishimoto E36 radiator rendering
Mishimoto E36 radiator rendering
Mishimoto E36 radiator rendering
Mishimoto E36 radiator rendering

With a rendering complete, we worked up a first prototype so we could begin testing both fitment and performance. Check back with us next time for a look at our prototype unit!

Thanks for reading!

Mishimoto bumper beam fabrication and prototype cooler

Mishimoto Subaru WRX/STi FMIC Kit, Part 2: Initial Intercooler Design

Time to start designing the basic dimensions of our intercooler! As mentioned in the previous post, this cooler would need to fit with all chassis if possible. Luckily we had a few of these vehicles as shop cars. First up, we pulled our 03 Bugeye Wagon into the shop and began taking a look at the space we had available in order to throw a huge core behind the bumper. Up on the lift she went and the bumper came off to reveal what we were working with.

Bugeye wagon intercooler prototyping and data collection
Bugeye wagon intercooler prototyping and data collection
Bugeye wagon intercooler prototyping and data collection
Bugeye wagon intercooler prototyping and data collection
Bugeye wagon intercooler prototyping
Bugeye wagon intercooler prototyping

As you can see we have a lot going on in these first few images. The first image shows our Romer arm. This device is used to collect data points on the vehicle and cooler in order to determine where our critical points are. This is a very key tool for use when designing a product on the vehicle or when collecting dimensional information from a factory component, and we use it quite often. You can also see that we started fabricating a mock-up cooler. We designed the core you see in the images based on some dimensions we had already obtained. Our engineering team began to tack together some sheet metal end tanks. Our final core will utilize a cast end tank for improved durability and smoother flow.

Additionally, we brought in a Bugeye sedan to ensure the minor front-end differences would not impact intercooler fitment. Check out a shot of the second test vehicle with all components removed.

Bugeye sedan prototype cooler test fitting
Bugeye sedan prototype cooler test fitting

Once again, we collected our data points and test fit our initial fabricated prototype cooler to check for clearances. Now that the Bugeye was covered, we brought in a Blobeye and a Hawkeye to check cooler fitment. Check out a few shots of the Hawk!

Hawkeye prototype cooler test fitting
Hawkeye prototype cooler test fitting
Hawkeye test vehicle engine bay
Hawkeye test vehicle engine bay

I would have to say this was my favorite test vehicle thus far during development. This vehicle owner was extremely competitive in local SCCA autocross events, and the car was quite impressive. It was nice to be able to pick her brain for a few minutes regarding her racing experience and vehicle modifications.

Now, we couldn’t leave out the GR chassis if we wanted to really stretch the use of this intercooler. This far, we were still able to provide a consistent intercooler design for the 02-07 models without sacrificing size. We needed to see if this was true for the newer models. This was going to be quite easy for us since our shop vehicle was a 2010 STi and would provide the measurements we needed.

GR STi test vehicle on lift
GR STi test vehicle on lift

In the image above we have the bumper removed as well as the bumper beam/support. This shows the mounting location for the beam we are planning to provide with the kit. Check out our fabricated beam and cooler below!

Mishimoto bumper beam fabrication
Mishimoto bumper beam fabrication
Mishimoto bumper beam fabrication and prototype cooler
Mishimoto bumper beam fabrication and prototype cooler

Now that we had dimensional data for all vehicles to be fitted with our intercooler prototype, we could now move forward with producing a prototype unit and performing a final fit. Once that was complete, we could begin fabricating the piping for each particular model. As you may be aware, the piping routing/features does indeed differ quite significantly between each vehicle, so these would have to be designed specific to the vehicle. Check back with us next time to get a nice look at our prototype intercooler for this kit!

Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI

Mishimoto Subaru WRX/STi FMIC Kit, Part 1: Product Goals/Plans

Mishimoto prototype intercooler installed on GR STI

Modifying your Subaru can be quite a slippery slope, especially when this wonderful pastime turns from a hobby to an obsession. Luckily, the enthusiast community is huge and always ready to provide support (or laughter), even when your fully built engine decides it wants nothing to do with a cylinder 3 connecting-rod bearing. As you may be aware, we are huge fans of both Subaru vehicles, and the communities that thrive around them. Our continually growing Subaru product line is about to get much bigger, and our team decided to tackle the development of a new front-mount intercooler for the 2002+ WRX and STi.

I know exactly what you are thinking. Why now? The car is ancient and the market is swamped with reasonably respectable FMIC kits. We have a few reasons for diving into this project. First, we have a rather healthy product line and we wanted to ensure we could support the cooling needs of all of our customers. Our product line includes all of the items listed below.

  • 2-row aluminum radiator
  • 3-row aluminum radiator
  • Aluminum fan shroud kits
  • Silicone coolant hose kits
  • Performance air intakes
  • Direct-fit oil cooler kits

This is quite extensive, and our hope is that enthusiasts will find our products to be a one-stop cooling solution. Additionally, we offer a top-mount intercooler kit for the 02-07 WRX (a 08-14 TMIC is on the way) and the 04-14 STI. Our top-mounts provide incredible efficiency improvements compared to the stock intercooler, all proven in our data collected on the dyno and road. That being said, a top-mount intercooler has its limits, even if it is a massive core. For those making above 375-400 whp, we always recommend a solid front-mount intercooler setup which will provide much better heat transfer thanks to its location in a fresh stream of airflow.

Our second reason for tackling this project has to do with other products on the market. We believe there is a huge gap in the market for a product that is reasonably priced, yet still provides bolt-on fitment and a very efficient core.

Our third reason for timing is our new facility, which many of you are aware of. We have a fantastic garage with any tool needed for product development. This includes an in-house AWD DynoJet dynamometer and a variety of fabrication equipment. For more on our facility and equipment, check out the link below.

http://engineering.mishimoto.com/learn-about-mishimoto-engineering/

Due to our brand-new, fantastic facility, it makes sense for us to utilize our equipment in the most effective way possible.

The final reason is our team’s interest in the topic of intercooler design. While designing efficient radiators and oil coolers is fun, we needed to mix things up and tackle another intercooler. Popping a vehicle on the dyno every once in a while keeps things interesting in the garage as well as the office. So, we wanted to set some guidelines and goals for the project to ensure we were creating something our customer base wanted.

Project Goals

  1. Develop a bolt-on kit for fitment on all generations of the WRX/STi. This includes vehicles from 2002-2014. Our 2015 kits will differ and we will have a build thread for those at a later date.
  2. Attempt to use one intercooler design for all chassis.
  3. Provide all piping necessary for installation.
  4. Test product to ensure intercooler efficiency.

As usual, we will now break these goals down a bit to expand on them slightly.

Like a Glove

As mentioned above, we are going to be offering a direct-fit product for all Subaru WRX and STi chassis’. These kits will need to fit without issues and include everything for installation. As with most (if not all) front-mount kits, the bumper beam will need to be removed and we will be supplying a replacement unit that will function with our intercooler. We will also be including all couplers, clamps, hardware, etc., to ensure that you have every item necessary to install our product. This process/goal is evident in 99% of our projects, as we work harder to make things easier on you guys. There are several differences between the different chassis/body styles so we will have to develop several differing kits. Our end goal is to make this kit appear as though it was factory installed.

One Cooler

If at all possible, our goal is to design one intercooler unit which is applicable on all bodies for the WRX/STi. This will be quite a challenge and will require taking a ton of data points from the vehicles and some serious test fitting. If we find that by doing this we are making compromises on the cooler size, we will have to produce more than one cooler. By using one cooler, we can spend more time ensuring that the cooler provides optimal flow and heat transfer characteristics.

Pipes

As mentioned above, we will be including all the piping necessary for each specific vehicle. Some of the piping is identical from one vehicle to the other, while other portions of the pipes change slightly due to engine bay constraints. Our engineering team will be fabricating our prototype piping in-house to ensure accuracy.

Test it

As with all of our products, we like to put them through their paces prior to shipping to our salivating customers. We will be testing inlet/outlet temperatures as well as core pressure loss to ensure we are providing a very efficient product. Although it will be difficult to provide the real-world results for every individual setup, by providing intercooler efficiency information we should be able to educate the customer regarding how efficient our core is at transferring heat. We are always interested in supporting our products with as much data as possible.

With our goals set, it was time to begin tackling the first key component for the kit, the intercooler itself. Check back with us next time to see our team working through our cooler design.

Mishimoto E46 M3 Oil Cooler Kit

Mishimoto BMW E46 M3 Direct-Fit Oil Cooler Kit, Part 5: Final Data Review

Mishimoto E46 M3 Oil Cooler Kit

The results are in and they are exactly what we expected! This cooler provided huge gains in cooling efficiency. Let’s take a look at the data we compiled. First up is the core volume comparison.

Core volume comparison
Core volume comparison

As you can see, the Mishimoto oil cooler provides a huge increase in total core volume. The fluid capacity for the stock cooler is 0.34 qt, while the Mishimoto cooler holds 0.78 qt. This is an increase in volume of 152%!

The additional fluid capacity will add 4 lb to the front end of the vehicle. Although not a huge number, we still needed to check if this added weight would produce any issues with the mounting brackets and stress-related failures. Our team used Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software to ensure that the bracket would support the added weight.

FEA bracket stress testing
FEA bracket stress testing

This analysis reveals any areas of the component that will experience stress and how that amount of stress will impact the integrity of the part. In this case, the material being used features a much higher yield strength compared to what it will experience during use. This component checks out!

Next up is the data that will answer the most important question of all: How is this cooler going to benefit you and your M3? Check out our temperature chart below!

Oil cooler temperature data comparison
Oil cooler temperature data comparison

The Mishimoto oil cooler provides huge gains in cooling performance. Remember, testing conditions were identical for both the stock cooler and the Mishimoto oil cooler. We saw the outlet temperature for the Mishimoto cooler decrease by as much as 30°F.

The next chart shows our evaluation of cooler efficiency. By measuring the inlet and outlet temperatures, we can see how effective the cores are at exchanging heat.

Oil cooler efficiency data comparison
Oil cooler efficiency data comparison

The Mishimoto oil cooler provides an efficiency increase of 29% compared to the stock cooler. This improvement is vital for keeping safe temperatures on the track.

Finally, we collected fluid pressure data to ensure that our product did not have a negative impact on oil pressure.

Oil cooler pressure loss data comparison
Oil cooler pressure loss data comparison

The Mishimoto oil cooler provides a dramatic 11 psi reduction in pressure loss compared to the stock cooler!

So, now that we had a slew of impressive performance gains, this product testing was complete. Let’s quickly review our initial goals to see how well this project stayed on target.

Project Goals

  1. Kit must be a direct fit, all inclusive, and require no irreversible vehicle modification.

This kit is a direct-fit unit that includes all necessary components for installation and requires no irreversible vehicle modification. The kit includes an oil cooler, stainless steel braided oil lines, an adapter kit for the oil lines, and all necessary hardware. The only minor modification required is the removal of the oil cooler shrouding, which can be reinstalled if the user wishes to revert to the stock setup.

  1. Must provide a proven reduction in oil temperatures.

Our real-world testing showed a 30°F reduction in fluid temperatures and a 29% improvement in cooler efficiency. This oil cooler is a perfect upgrade from the stock unit for those who drive aggressively and/or track their M3.

  1. Pressure loss must be similar or better compared to the stock cooler.

Our oil cooler provided an improvement in pressure loss of 11 psi across the core!

  1. Cooler must function with either the stock or Mishimoto radiator.

Our test fitting confirmed that the Mishimoto oil cooler will function perfectly with the stock radiator or the Mishimoto Performance Aluminum Radiator! To see more information about our aluminum radiator, visit the link below!

http://engineering.mishimoto.com/?cat=113

This project is complete! Check out the image of this kit below!

Mishimoto E46 M3 Oil Cooler Kit
Mishimoto E46 M3 Oil Cooler Kit

Feel free to follow up with any questions or comments. Stay tuned for future BMW development projects!

Thanks

Temperature sensors installed

Mishimoto BMW E46 M3 Direct-Fit Oil Cooler Kit, Part 4: Cooler Installation and Data Collection

Time to see if this cooler can make a significant impact on fluid temperatures. As before, we borrowed a test fit vehicle from the folks over at Open Road Tuning. Once we had the car on the lift, we removed the factory cooler lines and spliced our temperature sensors into the stock lines so we could collect inlet and outlet fluid temperatures.

Temperature sensors installed
Temperature sensors installed
Laptop prepared for data collection
Laptop prepared for data collection

Once everything was installed and checked for leaks, we hit the road. The testing conditions below were followed for both the stock cooler and the Mishimoto oil cooler prototype.

Testing Conditions

  • Ambient temperature: 69°F–70F° (20.5˚C–21.1˚C)
  • Humidity: 20%
  • Sensor: PLX temperature sensor reading 10 times per second
  • Driving conditions: 65 mph highway, cruise for 5 miles (special attention given to vehicles driving in front of the M3 to assure fresh airflow to cooler)
  • Oil housing thermostat: Removed to achieve accurate data

Once we had our data for the stock cooler, the team returned to the shop and allowed the vehicle to cool. We then installed the Mishimoto oil cooler prototype and verified fitment!

Mishimoto prototype installed
Mishimoto prototype installed

Our sensors were then installed in our -10AN stainless lines to collect our temperature data.

Mishimoto prototype installed with temperature sensors
Mishimoto prototype installed with temperature sensors
Mishimoto prototype installed with temperature sensors
Mishimoto prototype installed with temperature sensors

We then hit the road for data collection, following the same testing conditions as with the stock cooler. Although difficult to see, you can spot the cooler through the bottom of the grille!

Mishimoto prototype installed
Mishimoto prototype installed

Additionally, because we were planning to remove the shrouding from the oil cooler to install the larger Mishimoto unit, we decided to experiment with a fabricated shroud to see if it would have an impact on efficiency. After fabricating this component, numerous tests were conducted similar to the testing conditions described above. We did not see any appreciable gains in efficiency with the addition of a shroud, so we will not be including this with our design. Our airflow testing showed that even without a shroud, our cooler was receiving ample airflow for cooling efficiency.

Now that we had our real-world testing data, we headed back to HQ to crunch the numbers for cooler performance. Check back next time for the review of our data and a few shots of the finished product!

Mishimoto prototype oil cooler (right) and stock oil cooler (left)

Mishimoto BMW E46 M3 Direct-Fit Oil Cooler Kit, Part 3: Cooler Comparison and Adapter Installation

Welcome to our third installment of the build! We are nearing the completion of this project, with only some final test fitting necessary and data collection to ensure that this product performs to our standards. First, take a look at the Mishimoto oil cooler compared to the stock unit.

Mishimoto prototype oil cooler (right) and stock oil cooler (left)
Mishimoto prototype oil cooler (right) and stock oil cooler (left)
Mishimoto prototype oil cooler (top) and stock oil cooler (bottom)
Mishimoto prototype oil cooler (top) and stock oil cooler (bottom)
Mishimoto prototype oil cooler (top) and stock oil cooler (bottom)
Mishimoto prototype oil cooler (top) and stock oil cooler (bottom)
Mishimoto prototype oil cooler under stock oil cooler
Mishimoto prototype oil cooler under stock oil cooler

The Mishimoto oil cooler is massive compared to the stock unit. Greater size will provide improved capacity that will aid in reducing temperatures. Additionally, the Mishimoto cooler is constructed using a bar-and-plate core that our engineering team designed. This core will provide improvements in heat transfer compared to the stock tube-and-fin cooler. For reference, the images below show the core size difference.

Stock oil cooler thickness
Stock oil cooler thickness
Mishimoto oil cooler thickness
Mishimoto oil cooler thickness

The Mishimoto oil cooler boasts an increase in thickness of over 1 inch! We will have a more in depth evaluation of the core size later on. First, let’s install our oil line adapter setup in preparation for cooler testing!

Mishimoto oil line adapter installed
Mishimoto oil line adapter installed
Mishimoto oil line adapter installed
Mishimoto oil line adapter installed

That concludes the third part of our build log. Next time we will be installing our prototype cooler, setting up our sensors and lines, and collecting testing data for our cooler design.

Thanks for reading!

7

Ford Mustang 2.3L EcoBoost Intercooler Evaluation

7

Here at Mishimoto Automotive, we’re really excited for the new Ecoboost Mustang.

So excited in fact that we couldn’t wait for the car to get here to begin Product Development.

We have a factory Mustang intercooler in house and are going to begin analyzing it while we wait for a development car to arrive. In the meantime, we wanted to give our fellow enthusiasts a quick look at what the factory unit looks like.

Check out the video and image gallery below!

Video Link: http://www.mishimoto.com/mishimoto-review-mustang-2015-ecoboost-intercooler.html

Expect to see a lot more from us in the coming months. We’ll be posting in-depth development threads, showing you all the different testing and analysis that goes into each and every one of our products.

In the meantime, what else do you want to know about the OE Intercooler?

Thanks!

Stock 2015 WRX oil cooler

Mishimoto 2015 Subaru WRX Thermostatic Oil Cooler Kit, Part 1: Product Introduction and Reasoning

After releasing our most recent direct-fit oil cooler kit for the 2015 Subaru WRX, questions from our fan base and online communities began to fill our inboxes. Our kit included all necessary components for installation and placed a large 19-row oil cooler in the front grille area. We saw huge gains in cooling performance for this particular setup, with decreases of over 25°F. This project was extremely successful and we anticipated that our customers would be very pleased with the performance. The primary concern with a portion of enthusiasts was low fluid temperatures. This kit was designed with a vehicle-specific oil sandwich plate that sat on top of the factory oil cooler/warmer. The sandwich plate is shown below.

Mishimoto 2015 WRX oil sandwich plate
Mishimoto 2015 WRX oil sandwich plate

For more information about the development process of this product, check out the build log at the link below!

http://engineering.mishimoto.com/?cat=108

This was a truly unique design, however the one feature this component lacked was an internal thermostat of any sort. We designed this product to function in conjunction with the stock heat exchanger. By doing so we would be using the warming capabilities of the stock cooler to bring fluid temperatures up and then using our liquid-to-air cooler to regulate them properly. Now, being that fluid is constantly running to the cooler, warmup rates are going to be slightly slower compared to the stock setup. Some of our customers in colder climates were concerned about this, being that fluid temperatures that are too cold can often be just as harmful as hot fluid temperatures. In order to provide product support for customers in colder environments, we selected to tackle a thermostatic version of this kit.

Being that we already had several thermostatic oil sandwich plates, we decided to utilize one of these components in conjunction with the appropriate CNC-machined pieces to achieve the desired setup and functionality.

Check out a few shots of the factory liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger to see with what we are dealing with.

Stock 2015 WRX oil cooler
Stock 2015 WRX oil cooler
Stock 2015 WRX oil cooler
Stock 2015 WRX oil cooler
Stock 2015 WRX oil cooler removed from vehicle
Stock 2015 WRX oil cooler removed from vehicle

As you can see from the above images, the stock oil warmer is located on the oil filter housing. The unit is attached to the housing using the long center bolt you see in the third image, which is also a port for fluid to run through. This unit features a single inlet and single outlet coolant port so that it can transfer heat from engine coolant to oil. A single O-ring seals this unit to the oil filter housing.

One unique feature is the cup at the top of the heat exchanger. This piece is utilized to allow any residual oil to pool and drain back into the housing during servicing. This creates a challenge for our team, as you cannot simple attach one of our standard sandwich plates. Additionally, the warmer sits in a similar cup at the top of the filter housing, presenting a challenge for our engineering team.

Check back with us next time for a look at what our team created to add thermostatic capabilities to our oil cooler kit for the 2015 WRX.

Thanks for reading!

An inside look at the engineering of Mishimoto products.

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