Nissan Titan XD DPF-Back Exhaust R&D Part 1: Stock Evaluation

Our Titan XD has been poked and prodded, and the next upgrade we are working on is a DPF-back exhaust. Before we begin development, we like to take a peek at the stock version to determine which upgrades we can make to the design. Our first observation was that this exhaust is, well, plain. Not to worry; our goal is to spice up the design a bit to give this Titan more to show off.

Stock Titan XD Exhaust
Stock Titan XD Exhaust
Stock Titan XD Exhaust
Stock Titan XD Exhaust

You will have to excuse the mud coating on the bottom of our XD. All we can say is the team enjoyed “testing” the Titan’s suspension maybe a bit too much.

Mishimoto's Titan XD
Mishimoto’s Nissan Titan XD

Directly under the Titan is a rather large catalytic converter bolted to the diesel particulate filter (DPF). This takes up a large portion of the exhaust system, and we want to leave it intact for emissions reasons.

Stock Titan XD Exhaust
Stock Titan XD Exhaust
Stock Titan XD Exhaust
Stock Titan XD Exhaust

The section that we intend to replace is the piping after the DPF that extends from the back of the Titan. We will design a replacement for the piping section that clamps to the DPF and has a much better looking exhaust tip than stock.

Stock Titan XD Exhaust
Stock Titan XD Exhaust

Coming Up!

Next up is a look at how we fabricate our exhaust, as well as a look at our unique plan for the tip section. Until then, sound off in the comments section and let us know what you would like to see created for the Titan XD.

Stay Tuned!

-Sara

               

Upgrading Induction: 2015+ Mustang GT Induction Hose R&D, Part 1: Design Elements

Improving airflow is now a recurring theme for the stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake. In addition to finding air flow restrictions in our project to replace the entire stock intake system, we’ve also found several ways that a silicone induction hose for S550 drivers could improve airflow for drivers who would rather not replace their stock intakes. The stock piece is not only restrictive in size, but it also makes use of a resonator. We can make several improvements to take this induction hose design to the next level.

IMG_5013r
Stock 2015+ Mustang parts
Stock 2015+ Mustang parts
Stock 2015+ Mustang parts

The hose itself is straightforward, except for the number of ports and attachments. We will be including those four ports in our design and will incorporate quick-disconnect fittings. Take a look at the image below.

A look at the many port attachments
A look at the many port attachments

To increase the amount of airflow that can travel from the airbox, we must enlarge the entire tube. This will produce give us an increase in volumetric area inside the tube. Although our goal is to increase airflow, we want to ensure consistency with this increase to prevent turbulence. With more airflow we hope to increase power as well.

Be sure to stay tuned as we continue progress on the induction hose upgrade for this 2015+ Mustang GT intake! In the meantime, check out a sneak peak of our first working prototype!

Prototype intake tube
Prototype intake tube

 

Thanks for reading.

-Diamaan

Tanks, But No Tanks – 2013+ Subaru BRZ / Toyota FR-S Overflow Tank, Part 1: OEM Review and 3D Models

I have been a big fan of Subaru vehicles for a substantial part of my life, and I have lots of experience with WRXs, but the BRZ (and FR-S) is still very new to me. Not too long ago, one of our engineers had his 2013 Subaru BRZ out in the parking lot, and I asked him to pop the hood so that I might check out the power plant. Have you ever seen an old episode of Scooby-Doo when Shaggy opens a door and jumps about a mile in the air, screaming, having revealed the spooky ghost residing therein? Well, you can call me Shaggy, and here is the ghost:

BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)
BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)

Like, zoinks! Look at all that hideous white plastic – nobody wants a haunted Toyobaru, but how on earth would one solve this problem? Who ya gonna call?

Mishimoto!

Overflow Tank Functionality

Our ghostbusters engineers are already chugging right along in the development of an awesome new overflow tank for the 2013+ FR-S/BRZ. An overflow tank is an important part of a car’s cooling system; it serves to receive and store coolant that is purged from the radiator in high-pressure situations. An overflow tank, unlike an expansion tank, is not pressurized and contains a vacuum line through which coolant is drawn back into the system when needed. An expansion tank is part of a sealed, pressurized system that allows the radiator to purge coolant when it is overly hot and expansive, and to draw it back in when the system cools to a sufficient degree. It does this by utilizing the pressure differential that varies with temperature to create a vacuum condition due to air that is part of the system; another important distinction is that coolant does not have to purge through a pressure cap before entering the tank because it is a pressurized component in the system.

BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)
BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)

As you can see, the OEM unit is a bulbous hunk of white plastic (although this one is sporting a snazzy Mishimoto silicone coolant line – part of our BRZ/FR-S Radiator Hose Kit). Our Mishimoto tank replacement will be an attractive aluminum piece, and it will hold a larger volume of coolant than the OEM unit. We have already modeled the piece and recently 3D printed it to check fitment.

BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)
BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)

In order to test fit, we needed first to remove that OEM poltergeist.

BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)
BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)

After the exorcism was complete, we made quick work of throwing in our prototype.

BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)
BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)

The tank fit well and looks markedly better than the OEM unit! Check out a photo of the two pieces side by side for a more direct comparison.

BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)
BRZ Parts (or FR-S Parts)

Definitely an improvement, and it will look even better in aluminum!

Coming Soon – Renderings

This project is well underway, and we will have some cool renderings to present in the not-too-distant future. Check back for more details on this project, and enjoy your cars as the summer weather starts to creep in!

Thanks for reading,
-Gardiner

Cooling the Camaro. 2016+ SS Primary Radiator R&D, Part 2: 3D Models

Greetings everyone! I hope you all enjoyed Cinco de Mayo last week. We celebrated here at the Mishimoto R&D Center with a salsa and dip competition – let me tell you, many of our team members have just as much talent in the kitchen as they do in the design center (and those of us who don’t were grateful taste testers).

Though our schedules have been VERY busy with projects, the beginning of show season, and maybe a few siestas here and there (definitely a necessity after all those corn chips!), our engineers have been able to squeeze in some time designing our improved aluminum 2016 Camaro SS radiator. I am here to show you the fruits of their labors! Let’s take a peek at what they created.

2016 Camaro radiator – Front View
2016 Camaro radiator – Front View

What, were you expecting photos of the salsa? These are the first 3D models of the 2016 Camaro SS radiator. Our engineers did an excellent job with this; the radiator is thicker than the stock part to improve cooling efficiency and retains all OEM functionality, including the internal transmission fluid cooler. Here it is again from the rear angle.

2016 Camaro radiator – Rear View
2016 Camaro radiator – Rear View

And once again, from the side.

2016 Camaro radiator – Side View
2016 Camaro radiator – Side View

As you may remember from our first post or from our post on the development of our auxiliary radiators, the OEM Camaro radiator incorporates a variety of unique features that necessitate a pretty complex end-tank design, including distribution channels to the aux rads. As you can see above, our engineers accounted for each detail to ensure that this part will fit just as well as the stock radiator.

Coming Up – 3D-Printed Prototypes

The next step in this process is to 3D print some models of our end tanks for a test fit. Keep checking back for photos and information on that process, as well as updates during the remainder of our development cycle for the 2016 Camaro SS Radiator! Drop us a comment below if you’ve got any questions, or reach out to us in our forum thread.

Thanks for reading!
-Gardiner

2015+ Ford Mustang GT Performance Intake R&D, Part 1: The Stock System

We’ve had our Mustang GT for a good while now, and it’s time to begin our development of the performance intake. We’ll begin by quickly dissecting the stock system and deciding on the direction we’d like to go with our design.

Stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake
Stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake

The stock intake is fairly standard; from the center-mounted throttle body, the intake tube extends toward the driver side of the engine bay and incorporates the curved design that embodies the style of that classic V8 intake.

Stock resonator and mass airflow sensor
Stock resonator and mass airflow sensor

Above is an image of the resonator. Most modern cars today have this part as a standard component attached to the intake system. Let’s check out some shots of the intake system removed from the car.

Stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake
Stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake
Stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake
Stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake

These stock 2015+ Mustang parts must compensate for the length of the front end of this car. Since this system is located some distance from the front end, the intake has a snout that grabs air right from the front grille.

Stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake
Stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake

Above, take a look at how the airbox houses the filter on this stock 2015+ Mustang GT intake. The box is pretty deep, so there is some distance for the air to travel before it hits the filter when it is collected from the front of the car.

Lastly, let’s take a quick look at the top part of the stock intake system.

Top part of stock 2015+ Mustang parts
Top part of stock 2015+ Mustang parts
Top part of stock 2015+ Mustang parts
Top part of stock 2015+ Mustang parts

Similar to the snout, you can see another small resonator assembly attached in the path of airflow travel. Ford wanted to ensure proper induction sound on this 5.0L Coyote engine.

Now that we have gone over this stock intake system, let’s evaluate our plan to make our design even better. We know that these Mustang GT’s have a sensitive mass airflow (MAF) sensor. We also know that many aftermarket competitors offer intakes that require a tune. We need to ensure that our MAF sensor housing is an appropriate size, which will provide the necessary balance between safety on a stock tune and the ability to produce a good amount of power.

We intend to design a fully enclosed airbox that will work nicely with the front end of this car. The box design will be important because a lot of space remains when the stock system is removed. We have an opportunity to design an intake that will not only increase power, but also really grab the attention of anyone looking under the hood.

What’s Next?

Prototype 2015+ Mustang parts
Prototype 2015+ Mustang parts

Our engineers have already begun playing around with a few ideas for designing our 2015+ Mustang parts. Check out the image above of a possible bracket design for our airbox! A prototype design is now in the works, so stay tuned for our next update!

Thanks for reading!

-Diamaan

An inside look at the engineering of Mishimoto products.

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