Filtering Your 6.4L Coolant, Part 1: Initial Prototype

We mentioned in our 6.0L coolant filtration thread that we would be tackling the 6.4L as well. Let’s take a look at some of the components our team has been putting together for the 6.4L kit.

Although the 6.4L does not seem to be as susceptible to buildups as is the 6.0L, a coolant filtration setup is certainly still a worthy investment in preventive maintenance.

So let’s get started!

Filter Housing

We’ll start with the filter housing. As mentioned in our 6.0L thread, we developed a housing with a wide range of adjustability that could be utilized for a variety of kits. This housing is shown below.

Mishimoto coolant filtration housing
Mishimoto coolant filtration housing
Mishimoto coolant filtration housing
Mishimoto coolant filtration housing

Here’s a look at the hardware and filter mounted to this housing.

Mishimoto coolant filtration housing and Wix filter
Mishimoto coolant filtration housing and Wix filter

Since we had our housing already, this project should move along relatively quickly. We would need to develop a mounting bracket and run some coolant lines for this kit.

Bracket Development

After evaluating the vehicle, our engineering team determined that the ideal location for our kit would be along the passenger-side frame rail. As you probably know, the 6.4L engine bay is rather tight and real estate is hard to come by. To make servicing easier, and to allow space for performance upgrades, we would be mounting this kit under the vehicle.

We changed our developmental process with this one a bit. Instead of making a fabricated prototype first and then modeling it in 3D, we did the opposite. Dimensions were gathered from the truck and a design was made. We then used a flat-pack printout to create a fabricated component. Check it out!

Prototype bracket drawing
Prototype bracket drawing
Prototype bracket test fitting
Prototype bracket test fitting
Prototype bracket test fitting
Prototype bracket test fitting

We installed the filter housing and filter to check clearances and ensure our outlets would work with this location.

Prototype bracket test fitting
Prototype bracket test fitting
Prototype bracket test fitting
Prototype bracket test fitting

Now that we had a functional bracket, we decided to spend a little time determining the style. We modeled a few designs of the the bracket and then put a post on the forums to get opinions from the folks who would be interested in such a kit.

The design ideas we had in mind are shown below.

Prototype bracket X-design
Prototype bracket X-design
Prototype bracket 6.4L design
Prototype bracket 6.4L design

After running a poll on the forums for quite some time, we ended up with essentially a 50/50 split. We decided to move forward with the more subtle X design.

Prototype bracket 6.4L X-design
Prototype bracket 6.4L X-design
Prototype bracket 6.4L X-design
Prototype bracket 6.4L X-design
Prototype bracket 6.4L X-design
Prototype bracket 6.4L X-design

Check back with us next time for a look at our final prototype, the test fitting of that component, and the plans we have for routing the hoses.

Thanks for reading!

6.4L Powerstroke Silicone Hose Upgrade, Part 2: Product Completion and Final Design

Our full prototype unit has arrived and is ready for some final test fitting! Before introducing our final product, let’s take one last look at the stock hose setup.

Stock 6.4L radiator hoses
Stock 6.4L radiator hoses

Now, check out the Mishimoto prototype kit!

Mishimoto prototype 6.4L radiator hoses
Mishimoto prototype 6.4L radiator hoses

A few interesting things to note. First, we have replaced several of the bends that were previously plastic with our silicone hose. Instead of incorporating the bends into the quick disconnect fittings, we are using the hose to make all the bends.

Also, the stock hose uses a double O-ring connection on the engine-side quick disconnects. On the radiator side, the stock still uses a single O-ring system. We use double O-ring connections on both ends of our hoses for better protection against leaks and to reduce the chance of air entering the cooling system of your 6.4L.

Our lower hose is still a two-piece unit; however, we are using an aluminum bead-rolled pipe for connecting the two hoses instead of a factory quick disconnect. Check out this connection point!

Mishimoto lower hose connection point
Mishimoto lower hose connection point

Take a closer look at our finished hoses!

Mishimoto 6.4L silicone hose kit
Mishimoto 6.4L silicone hose kit
Mishimoto 6.4L silicone hose kit
Mishimoto 6.4L silicone hose kit

Next, we installed these in our test truck to check final fitment. Take a look!

Mishimoto 6.4L silicone hose kit installed
Mishimoto 6.4L silicone hose kit installed
Mishimoto 6.4L silicone hose kit installed
Mishimoto 6.4L silicone hose kit installed

Once the lower hose was successfully installed, we had a fully functioning silicone hose kit that fit perfectly. At this point, mass production of the hose kit begins, and we prepare to release an awesome product for 6.4L owners.

Thanks for following along with the progress of our build. We are hoping to launch a presale for this particular kit within the next few weeks! Stay tuned for more details.

Thanks

The Mustang EcoBoost Intercooler, Part 1: Stock Cooler

With nearly a 30-year gap between the old and new turbocharged 4-cylinder Mustang, some things are bound to change. The new Mustang features many interesting advances in technology, including direct injection, a twin-scroll turbocharger, a DOHC cylinder head with variable valve timing, and a newly designed intercooler. The 80’s model featured a top-mount intercooler that was fed cool air through a functional hood scoop. This was pretty slick stuff for the days when the Walkman revolutionized how we listen to music, and “the Clapper” paved the way for a new level of laziness.

The new Mustang features a very efficient front-mounted intercooler that fits right below the radiator. A fresh stream of airflow passes through the tube-and-fin core and works to combat high intake temperatures.

We’ve been highlighting our progress on the development of a variety of new components for the 15’ Mustang, and it’s finally time to get caught up on our intercooler design! Follow our progress below.

Stock Intercooler Design

Before jumping into the new cooler design, let’s took a look at the stock intercooler and its location. This would give us a good idea of where improvements can be made.

Here are a few shots of the stock cooler in its proper position.

Stock intercooler installed
Stock intercooler installed
Stock intercooler installed
Stock intercooler installed
Stock intercooler installed
Stock intercooler installed

Next, we stripped the stock setup from our test vehicle!

Stock intercooler removed
Stock intercooler removed

Once removed, we took a closer look at what Ford provided with the EcoBoost Mustang.

Stock intercooler
Stock intercooler
Stock intercooler
Stock intercooler
Stock intercooler
Stock intercooler
Stock intercooler
Stock intercooler

The exterior fins are reasonably dense on this stock cooler. We then took a peek at the internal fins.

Stock intercooler internal fins
Stock intercooler internal fins

We planned to pull this unit apart for further inspection, but first we grabbed a few of the dimensions using our Romer arm. This would help us plan a few of the mounting points and general constraints once we get to the point of designing our cooler.

Obtaining stock intercooler dimensions via coordinate measuring machine
Obtaining stock intercooler dimensions via coordinate measuring machine

Stock Intercooler Internals

Now that the measuring was complete, off with the end tanks! These are removed easily by bending the crimped edges. The plastic tanks seal to the core with a rubber gasket.

Stock intercooler end tank removed
Stock intercooler end tank removed
Stock intercooler end tank internal surface
Stock intercooler end tank internal surface

We were then left with a bare core!

Stock intercooler core
Stock intercooler core
Stock intercooler core
Stock intercooler core

We then snagged basic core dimensions!

Stock intercooler core dimensions
Stock intercooler core dimensions

Let’s quickly recap our findings on the stock cooler and outline our plans for the Mishimoto unit.

Stock Intercooler

  • Measures 20.5” x 5.75” x 3.2” for a total core volume of approximately 380 cubic inches
  • Tube-and-fin core design
  • Plastic end tanks crimped to the intercooler core
  • Clamped hose connections on both inlet and outlet
  • Fits in place under the radiator
  • Features tank-mounted Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor

Mishimoto Intercooler Plans

  • Increase volume substantially with a 4+” thick core
  • Cast aluminum end tanks for increased durability and smooth flow
  • Bar-and-plate intercooler core
  • Direct fit including all piping connections
  • Fit in the stock location without blocking airflow to radiator
  • Retain the factory active grille-shutter system
  • Improve horsepower and lower the intake temperatures

We have some pretty big plans for this intercooler! Be sure to check back for a look at our first prototype unit.

Thanks

Mishimoto 2015+ Ford Mustang 2.3L EcoBoost Direct-Fit Baffled Oil Catch Can System, Part 4: Results and Project Conclusion

Interested in picking up this awesome catch can kit? Check out our discounted pre-sale at the link below!

http://www.mishimoto.com/ford-mustang-ecoboost-baffled-oil-catch-can-kit-15.html

 

When we left you last time, we had equipped our Mustang up with our prototype dual-can setup, and we sent the vehicle out for some road use. Since we would be testing other components (intake and intercooler) at the same time, dyno pulls would also be conducted with this setup installed.

After just 300 miles of road use, this is what we found.

PCV catch can contents
PCV catch can contents
PCV catch can contents
PCV catch can contents

It’s Interesting that our breather-side catch can looked fairly empty after our road testing.

Breather catch can contents
Breather catch can contents

The can above was bone dry. We continued to accumulate miles, and strangely enough, this can still did not collect any fluid. Although it had a scent of fuel and oil, accumulation was nonexistent.

With our results in, we came to the conclusion that our kit would include only the PCV-side catch can. We would never want to sell a product that does not function or does not provide any benefits to your vehicle. Sure, it is possible that some high-powered applications might produce blow-by in the breather line. If the need arises to launch a dual setup, we have all the prototypes ready to go for mass production. For now, Mishimoto will offer a single, proven catch can kit.

So what does this kit now include?

  • Mishimoto two-port compact baffled oil catch can (anodized black)
  • Two oil catch can fittings
  • Powder-coated steel catch can mounting bracket
  • Silicone catch can lines with OEM-style quick-disconnect fittings
  • Four worm-gear clamps for hose connection points
Prototype kit components
Prototype kit components

A look at the OEM-style quick-disconnect fittings we will be including!

Quick-disconnect fitting
Quick-disconnect fitting

Our renderings of the hoses and bracket to be included with this kit.

Catch can bracket 3D model
Catch can bracket 3D model
Catch can silicone hose 3D model
Catch can silicone hose 3D model

So that’s it, the project is complete and we have an effective catch can system for the EB Mustang. We were able to remove oil and fuel byproduct from the PCV system without modifying the factory hose routing or system design. We should have images of our finalized and assembled hoses soon, along with the production-quality brackets.

Thanks for following along with the progress of our kit. Would anyone be interested in a presale discount for this kit? Let us know!

Thanks

Interested in picking up this awesome catch can kit? Check out our discounted pre-sale at the link below!

http://www.mishimoto.com/ford-mustang-ecoboost-baffled-oil-catch-can-kit-15.html

SN95 Mustang Radiator Woes? Mishimoto has the solution!

Car Exterior 1

Here at Mishimoto we’re always developing new products, with a great deal of them focused on enhancing the cooling systems of everything from old-school Datsun 240s to the latest Ford F-series diesel. Occasionally we revisit an existing product to see if we can give our fellow enthusiasts an even better solution for their performance cooling needs. A few years after we released our all-aluminum SN95 radiator to the public, we started to notice a trend. We were getting an increased number of warranty claims for radiators that had separated between the core and the end tanks.

Our engineering team investigated the issue and found out something very interesting: These kinds of failures were not limited to our customers. Just about every stock and aftermarket radiator manufacturer was reporting the same kind of failure!

With that in mind we knew it was time to bring in a car to answer these questions:

  1. What’s causing this problem?
  2. Is there a way to fix it?
  3. Will our solution really work?

First: What’s causing this problem?

Chassis Flex

We placed the test car (a GT) on our dyno and we could actually see the chassis flex as we applied more throttle input. This flexing action transfers to the radiator support and eventually twists the radiator, causing the core/end tank separation issues enthusiasts were seeing. If a car has been modified to make more power and torque, this issue gets exacerbated.

Aluminum radiators are generally more stiff and rigid than factory units with their plastic end tanks. Normally this doesn’t pose a problem, but in the SN95 it lead to radiator failures.

Second: We know what’s causing the problem. Is there a way to fix it?

Yes! After some thought, our engineers came up with a great idea: They wanted to reduce or eliminate the amount of chassis flex translated to the radiator itself. How could we do that?

We would be designing a system to isolate the radiator from as much of the chassis flex as possible. The design would use steel brackets on each end of the radiator. These brackets would be attached to the radiator by rubber bushings. The bushings would absorb most of the chassis flex that was otherwise getting transferred to the radiator.

Here are a few pictures of our initial designs in Solidworks.

Render 1

Render 2

Notice the little space in the upper and lower plate/core supports? It might not look like much, but that small space helps to absorb any chassis flex that manages to get through the isolation system and to the radiator. Pretty slick!

Now the real question: Does it work?

Our development car had great success with our updated design, but we knew that the true test would come from you, our fellow enthusiasts.

Our stabilizer system has been on the market for a few years now, and we’ve shipped hundreds of the new design to our customers. We’re happy to report that none of our customers have reported a failure related to end tank separation! This includes many forced induction cars that generate a lot more torque than your standard bolt-on will produce.

Here are some shots of the final product:

Thanks for taking a look at the process for designing our innovative solution for the Mustang radiator. If you are interested in picking one up for your SN95, check with our vendors for the best available pricing.

Feel free to ask any questions you have about our improved SN95 radiator. I’d love to help out!

Thanks!

An inside look at the engineering of Mishimoto products.

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