8th Generation Civic Si Intake Development, Part 3: Final Product Design

Our last write-up for this Civic Si intake included our dyno testing results as well as some insight into our use of 3D printing for rapid prototyping. Since then, we’ve tweaked our design to provide flawless fitment and we’ve constructed a final prototype. The last box to check on our list is a final fitment verification and road testing. Our test vehicle owner will be putting some additional road miles on the car and will offer his opinion of the improved intake sound. Soon we will have a new addition to our line of Honda Civic Si parts!

Final Prototype

Mishimoto Honda Civic Si final prototype parts
Mishimoto Honda Civic Si final prototype parts

As we’ve mentioned previously, this kit is a drop-in replacement for the stock setup. We will include all components needed for installation.

One of the key pieces to this kit is the aluminum intake pipe. Check out a closer look at this part!

Mishimoto Civic Si intake pipe final prototype
Mishimoto Civic Si intake pipe final prototype

As you can see, we intend to offer this in two finishes, a polished aluminum and a powder-coated black pipe. This pipe incorporates a stock-style MAF housing and will accept the stock sensor without issue. The smooth mandrel bend provides ideal airflow with minimal turbulence. In addition, the port on the pipe mates with the stock CCV line, requiring no modification to your Si.

Next, we have our air filter heat shield!

Mishimoto Honda Civic intake heat shield final prototype
Mishimoto Honda Civic intake heat shield final prototype
Mishimoto Honda Civic intake heat shield final prototype
Mishimoto Honda Civic intake heat shield final prototype

The purpose of this piece is to prevent high engine-bay temperatures from heat soaking the air filter. If heat-soak occurs, typically a loss of power will result due to the high intake temperatures. Most often, intake heat-soak will occur when airflow within the engine bay is absent, such as during long idle conditions (traffic, autocross staging, etc.). Our heat shield is in place to reduce the impact this heat has on our air filter and on the air entering the intake manifold.

We’ve constructed this piece from durable steel, which has been powder-coated black for higher scratch resistance. The edges are lined with a weather-stripping material to eliminate any vibrations between surfaces. Also notice the small bracket built into the front of the shield; this is in place to accept the stock cold-air inlet duct. You will see how this fits in our installed images later in this article. The box itself features two built-in mounting brackets. A third bracket is mounted to the box with the included hardware. This bracket is shown below.

Mishimoto Honda Civic intake heat shield ancillary bracket
Mishimoto Honda Civic intake heat shield ancillary bracket

Next up, our throttle-body coupler. This component mates our Civic Si intake piping to the throttle body.

Silicone throttle-body coupler for Mishimoto Civic Si intake
Silicone throttle-body coupler for Mishimoto Civic Si intake
Silicone throttle-body coupler for Mishimoto Civic Si intake
Silicone throttle-body coupler for Mishimoto Civic Si intake

This coupler is a five-ply unit and is far more durable than a rubber counterpart in terms of longevity and resistance to heat, oil, and fuel.

What would an intake system be without a filter? Check out the filter we are including with this Honda Civic intake kit!

Mishimoto Honda Civic Si parts
Mishimoto Honda Civic Si parts

This is our high-flow oiled filter. This unit is serviceable and can be cleaned for a lifetime of repeated use. The large surface area provides improved airflow compared to the stock paper filter.

Final Kit Installed

Time to bolt our final kit into place! Check out a few shots taken during the install!

The heat shield is tucked back in the rear of the engine bay, where the filter is positioned. Below you can see the cold-air duct in place on the clip we designed for our shield.

Mishimoto Honda Civic Si parts installed
Mishimoto Honda Civic Si parts installed

The heat shield is tucked back in the rear of the engine bay, where the filter is positioned. Below you can see the cold-air duct in place on the clip we designed for our shield.

Mishimoto Civic Si intake kit installed
Mishimoto Civic Si intake kit installed

Test Drive Report

The owner of this Si is an employee here at Mishimoto, so we were able to grill him with questions after he drove with this setup for a few days. In short, he was very pleased with the package. The intake sounded great, and he did indeed feel some extra power at the top end. He also reported that during normal driving conditions, light and partial throttle, the intake sounds similar to stock. During heavy acceleration and high throttle input, the sound is quite impressive.

Heat-soak never seemed to be an issue, despite temperatures reaching the mid-90s during the testing timeframe. This is fantastic to hear.

All positive points!

Coming up!

Not much left to do with this project! We will begin working on manufacturing our first batch of Honda Civic Si intake kits. In the meantime, we will be launching a discounted pre-sale for those who followed our progress. Check back for more details on the pricing and shipping information for our Civic Si intake pre-sale!

Thanks for reading!

-John

Pure VQ Sound! Mishimoto’s 350Z Performance Intake R&D, Part 3: Dyno Testing and Results

With our initial design completed, it is time to strap our Z to the dyno and make a few pulls. We would be evaluating power output and engine sound, both of which are important aspects of our Nissan 350Z intake design.

Dyno Testing

Setting vehicle up for Nissan 350Z intake testing
Setting vehicle up for Nissan 350Z intake testing

Once we had the car lined up properly, we were ready to make some pulls!

Setting vehicle up for 350Z air intake testing
Setting vehicle up for 350Z air intake testing

Check out a compilation from our dyno runs! You can really hear the VQ sing with our intake system installed.

Man, what an engine! The VQ sounds so good and is quite refreshing compared to the turbo four-cylinder vehicles we focused on for previous intake designs. The Mishimoto 350Z air intake elevates the volume and seems to deepen the overall tone, especially during initial throttle application. Overall, we had positive results for the sound produced, and we are very pleased.

So how did we do with power?

Keep in mind that we made numerous pulls with each setup (both stock and Mishimoto) until a consistent power curve was produced. Once we had three consistent runs, they were averaged to produce the comparison in power output shown below.

350Z intake dyno plot comparison
350Z intake dyno plot comparison

As you can see, very nice results! We made power throughout the entire powerband, from 3,000 rpm all the way to 6,400 rpm. Our maximum gains were achieved in the midrange, equating to 10 whp and 13 wtq. At the peak of the rpm band, our gains were 6 whp and 9 wtq.

When adding an intake, one of the primary concerns is the impact on the stock ECU tune in terms of air/fuel ratios. A review of the results showed that the ratios of our intake are extremely similar to the stock intake ratios. This setup is entirely safe and will not have a negative impact on engine integrity during any driving conditions.

Airflow and elimination of restriction are big contributors to our power gains. Our filter features a substantial improvement in surface area. Check out the actual data in the chart below!

350Z air intake filter surface area comparison
350Z air intake filter surface area comparison

Using our cone filter more than tripled the surface area of the stock air filter!

Creating a 3D Model

After recording successful testing data, we were pleased with the performance of our existing design. The next item on our list is to put these components into a 3D model. First, we collect dimensions for the airbox and MAF adapter using our CMM (coordinate measuring machine) table and Romer Arm!

Collecting dimensional data from Mishimoto Nissan 350Z intake prototype
Collecting dimensional data from Mishimoto Nissan 350Z intake prototype
Collecting dimensional data from Mishimoto 350Z intake prototype
Collecting dimensional data from Mishimoto 350Z intake prototype

Coming Up!

We need to make a few final tweaks to our 350Z air intake box design for improved fitment, which will be completed in the 3D modeling phase of development. Once done, we will be constructing a final prototype that reflects our full production design.

Check back for a look at our Nissan 350Z intake 3D models and our complete prototype!

Thanks for reading!

-John

Fresh Air for the Fiesta! ST Performance Intake R&D, Part 3: Making a Silicone Inlet Hose

This is a pretty cool post, something a bit out of the ordinary for our projects. We typically utilize our existing silicone boots in our intercooler kits, intake systems, etc. For this project, we decided to manufacture the first portion of our intake system from a wire-reinforced silicone hose. This would facilitate an easier installation, and it would also provide a smooth airflow transition from the small turbocharger compressor inlet to our intake’s large pipe diameter. Since we like to show you what goes into developing our prototypes, check out the process for creating our silicone turbo inlet hose below!

Printing Our Fixture

The hose we have in mind will follow the path of the stock induction hose, which is actually a plastic piece on the stock ST. Before beginning our silicone project, we needed a fixture that would serve as a base for the silicone layers that will be applied. After making a model in Solidworks, we fired up the 3D printer and watched as it churned out our component.

Printing 3D silicone Ford Fiesta ST intake hose fixture
Printing 3D silicone Ford Fiesta ST intake hose fixture
Printing 3D silicone Fiesta ST intake hose fixture
Printing 3D silicone Fiesta ST intake hose fixture

And our end result is below!

3D-printed silicone Fiesta ST intake hose fixture
3D-printed silicone Fiesta ST intake hose fixture

As you can see, the diameter of this pipe gradually increases from small to large. The outer diameter of this fixture will become the inner diameter of our completed silicone inlet hose.

Silicone Inlet Hose Creation

We’ve got some work to do! Our first layer of material is standard silicone, which is wrapped around the fixture until the entire piece is covered in a single, flat layer.

Silicone hose layer 1 for Fiesta ST parts
Silicone hose layer 1 for Fiesta ST parts
Silicone hose layer 1 for Ford Fiesta ST intake hose
Silicone hose layer 1 for Ford Fiesta ST intake hose

After some careful work, our first layer was complete.

Silicone hose layer 1 for Ford Fiesta ST intake hose
Silicone hose layer 1 for Ford Fiesta ST intake hose

Our second layer would be a slightly different material. Check it out below.

Fiber-embedded silicone layer for Fiesta ST parts
Fiber-embedded silicone layer for Fiesta ST parts

This layer is composed of fiber-embedded silicone, and it is the key component for the rigidity and strength needed in our end product. The fibers provide greater pressure tolerance, making it ideal for any pressurized system (e.g., cooling, CAC).

Like the standard silicone, this layer is wrapped around the fixture in a similar fashion.

Fiber-reinforced silicone layer for Fiesta ST parts
Fiber-reinforced silicone layer for Fiesta ST parts

The next portion of this build is a bit out of the ordinary for your typical silicone hose. Normal hoses and boots encompass the silicone and fiber layers, but for this inlet hose, we will be using metal wire to further reinforce the integrity of the hose. Why? Well, standard silicone hoses tend to collapse under extreme vacuum or suction, which is exactly what this hose will see. All our hoses that attach directly to a turbocharger compressor inlet are wire-reinforced for additional strength.

The wire is wound around the hose throughout its entire length.

Wire-reinforced layer for Fiesta ST parts
Wire-reinforced layer for Fiesta ST parts

The image below shows our Fiesta prototype next to a cutaway of our Subaru WRX turbo inlet hose, which also features wire reinforcement. Our final rendition of the Fiesta induction hose will likely feature thicker wire with less winds, similar to the WRX piece.

Wire-reinforced layer (top) and Subaru WRX inlet hose (bottom)
Wire-reinforced layer (top) and Subaru WRX inlet hose (bottom)

Our next layer is yet another slice of silicone on the sandwich that is our Fiesta inlet hose. Or perhaps it’s more like a wrap? Anyway, another layer of silicone is applied over the wire.

Third layer of silicone material for Ford Fiesta ST intake
Third layer of silicone material for Ford Fiesta ST intake

Another layer of fiber-reinforced material is added, followed by a final layer of plain silicone, resulting in our four-ply induction hose. I won’t bore you with more images of Mike wrapping these last two layers on the fixture, but I assure you he did it!

We’re not finished yet. There are a few more steps as we progress toward a completed silicone hose. Our next step is to wrap the hose in a protective tape to keep the silicone in place for baking. This tape is resistant to our baking temperature and will keep the silicone in position during the process.

Baking tape being applied to Fiesta ST intake hose
Baking tape being applied to Fiesta ST intake hose

This “tape” is not sticky and does not adhere to the silicone. It is wound tightly around the pipe to compress the silicone to its final shape.

Silicone Fiesta ST intake hose ready for baking
Silicone Fiesta ST intake hose ready for baking

The tedious portion of the process is now complete. From here out, it is as simple as baking a batch of brownies. We fired up the oven, popped in our hose, and waited while the silicone cured.

Note: Don’t do this at home. Baking silicone in the oven releases a pungent odor that will fill your house and ruin any meals cooked in that oven for the next few days.

Silicone hose baking for Fiesta ST parts
Silicone hose baking for Fiesta ST parts

Once we completed the numerous baking sessions and the hose had cooled, we trimmed the edges to our desired length. This revealed the numerous layers of material, similar to what you would see with any of our silicone products.

Ford Fiesta ST intake silicone hose
Ford Fiesta ST intake silicone hose

The baking tape was then removed, revealing our final product!

Mishimoto silicone turbo intake hose, final product
Mishimoto silicone turbo intake hose, final product

We even test fit this piece on the car with our intake piping!

Silicone Ford Fiesta ST intake hose installed
Silicone Ford Fiesta ST intake hose installed

Coming Up!

Before dyno testing we still have one important portion of our intake to tackle: the airbox. We have some pretty interesting plans for the design, so expect a post crammed with cutting, bending, welding, and plenty of flying sparks.

Thanks for reading!

-John

Rubbing Elbows with the 6.0L! Mishmoto Powerstroke Intake Elbow R&D, Part 2: 3D Modeling

We’re back with another update on our 6.0L Powerstroke intake elbow project! Last time we covered the stock unit and noted the plans we had for our rendition of the intake elbow. After collecting data from the stock piece, we began mapping our prototypes on 3D-modeling software.

Prototype 1

Our first prototype comes by way of the almighty 3D printer. We made a quick design in Solidworks to map out the appearance and dimensional constraints for our design.

Mishimoto 6.0L Powerstroke intake elbow prototype 1
Mishimoto 6.0L Powerstroke intake elbow prototype 1
Mishimoto 6.0L Powerstroke intake elbow prototype 1
Mishimoto 6.0L Powerstroke intake elbow prototype 1

The primary goal for this prototype was to check fitment of our lower flange and placement of our NPT bungs, and also to ensure that our inlet diameter and lip were correctly designed. The style of our “M” logo on the pipe is likely to be changed in the final design, which is reflected in our modeling images below.

Here are a few shots of this piece during test fitting!

Mishimoto Powerstroke intake elbow prototype test fit
Mishimoto Powerstroke intake elbow prototype test fit
Mishimoto Powerstroke intake elbow prototype test fit
Mishimoto Powerstroke intake elbow prototype test fit
Mishimoto Powerstroke intake elbow prototype test fit
Mishimoto Powerstroke intake elbow prototype test fit

Both our manifold flange and coupler connection were spot-on with this 3D-printed prototype. We could now continue design work on our final product.

Prototype 2 3D Models

Check out our most recent design from a variety of angles!

Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model

The images above show our predrilled and tapped bungs on the rear of the elbow, and our subtle “M” logo on the front. You can also see our intercooler boot connection point accurately depicted in the models. This connection point will provide perfect fitment with both Mishimoto and OEM boots. We will be including a replacement boot within this kit for the intake elbow!

Check out the 3D models below of the base flange that mates with the intake manifold!

Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto 6.0 Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model
Mishimoto Powerstroke intake elbow 3D model

We’ve precisely modeled the factory flange to provide hassle-free bolt-on fitment. Pretty cool stuff!

You may have noticed we included images in both polished and black. We are planning to offer three finish options for this component:

  • Polished Aluminum
  • Wrinkle-Black Powdercoat
  • Ford Wrinkle-Blue Powdercoat

In addition, we will be including a replacement high-pressure O-ring for installation as well as a factory-fit replacement boot!

Coming Up!

Exciting stuff on the way! Check back next time for a look at our first functional prototype!

Thanks for reading.

-John

Mishimoto E46 3-Series Aluminum Radiator R&D, Part 4: Prototype Testing

We are pretty pumped about our new BMW performance parts! Our prototype radiator looks great and fits great, so now let’s make sure it performs as well as we intended. As we noted previously, we’ve made a variety of improvements over the stock core to improve heat transfer and efficiency. Let’s take a look at the specs!

Core Improvements

BMW E46 radiator coolant surface area comparison
BMW E46 radiator coolant surface area comparison

Our first comparison is coolant surface area, which is a measure of the area of the coolant tubes within the core. Greater tube area results in increased heat transfer as well as increased fluid capacity. We’ve increased coolant surface area by 18% over the stock radiator core.

BMW E46 radiator air surface area comparison
BMW E46 radiator air surface area comparison

The chart above depicts air surface area, which is a measure of the area of the external cooling fins on the radiator. Air surface area is a big contributor to cooling efficiency and performance. You see, the greater number of fins packed into the core, the more contact points we have for heat to transfer from the air to the coolant tubes. We’ve improved fin surface area by 41% over stock with our radiator design. Our core is far denser than the stock unit, which should result in lower coolant temperatures and improved cooling efficiency.

The changes depicted in the charts above indicate an increase in coolant capacity of around 0.10 gallons, a 20% increase. Not a huge gain, because our radiator is similar in size to the stock unit, with just a minor increase in thickness. This was done to provide for perfect drop-in fitment with all stock components. Direct, hassle-free fitment is a primary goal for most of our BMW performance parts.

Product Testing

As shown in our last portion of this article series, we are installing temperature sensors on both the inlet and outlet E46 radiator hoses. This will allow us to record temperatures both pre-radiator and post-radiator to evaluate efficiency and temperature drop. Check out a look at our sensors!

BMW performance parts testing equipment
BMW performance parts testing equipment
BMW performance parts testing equipment
BMW performance parts testing equipment
E46 radiator testing sensors installed in radiator hose
E46 radiator testing sensors installed in radiator hose

Before we show the results, check out the list of testing conditions below.

Testing Conditions

  • Vehicle: 2001 BMW 325CI
  • Modifications: Mishimoto Performance Air Intake
  • Ambient temperature: 80°–85°F
  • Operation: 65 mph highway cruise for 3 minutes
  • Apparatus: AEM AQ1 Data-Logger system

Once we had a plan of attack, the AQ1 system was loaded and we hit the interstate for some cruising. After testing the stock E46 radiator, we swapped it for our aluminum counterpart and continued with exactly the same testing.

First, let’s see how the stock E46 radiator did during our steady-state test.

Stock radiator testing data
Stock radiator testing data

Inlet temperatures started at around 190°F and rose to around 195°F before stabilizing. Outlet temperatures at the start of the recording began just north of 140°F and dropped to 135°F before rising back up to 141°F by the end of the run. Now let’s check out the Mishimoto BMW E46 radiator plot.

Mishimoto radiator testing data
Mishimoto radiator testing data

The inlet temperature line is flatter with the Mishimoto E46 radiator, sticking around 188°F for the entire run. Temperatures exiting the radiator were also lower. At the start of the run, we measured temperatures around 116°F, which peaked at 120°F and dropped back to 118°F at the end of our data collection.

On average, we saw a 19°F drop in radiator outlet temperatures with the Mishimoto radiator. This is pretty impressive for low-stress driving conditions. Below is a plot with our outlet temperature lines compared.

Radiator outlet temperature comparison
Radiator outlet temperature comparison

Fantastic results! Our primary goal with this radiator was to provide improved reliability with an all-aluminum design. We had a secondary goal of improving cooling efficiency, which we certainly succeeded in doing.

Coming Up!

We have a BMW E46 radiator that fits perfectly and provides impressive benefits in terms of cooling performance. Our first batch of radiators will be available during a discounted pre-sale. Check back soon for details on our pre-sale pricing and estimated shipping information. In addition, keep an eye on our blog for more awesome development of new BMW performance parts.

Thanks for following our progress!

-John

 

An inside look at the engineering of Mishimoto products.

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