Mustang GT Exhaust Component R&D, Part 5: Axleback Fabrication

Last time we wrapped up our resonator-delete testing, and with that component good to go, we’re on to our next conquest, axleback exhausts. If you have not had a chance to take a look at our resonator deletes check out our blog posts HERE.

Axleback Fabrication

Any living, breathing car enthusiast knows that the exhaust is an important modification for modern muscle. Most owners want to rid themselves of the stock sound and let their pony car be heard right out of the gate. Being s550 owners ourselves, we want to hear the unrestricted growl of the Coyote in our GT, so we set out to design some axlebacks. We intend to design a few options as we want to offer an exhaust for every taste.  We plan to test a straight-pipe option for those who want to hear the GT scream, a small-muffler option for those who want an aggressive note but have neighbors, and a large-muffler option for those who like a more tame sound.

We began the design process by applying the data we obtained from the stock exhaust on our ruby GT to design a jig. Using our waterjet, we cut the individual pieces for the jig out of fairly thick sheet metal. The jig will guide our design as we fabricate the exhausts, ensuring that the prototype exhausts fit the GT.

Creating the jig for our 2015 Mustang exhaust
Creating the jig for our 2015 Mustang exhaust

The waterjet allows us to rapidly create pieces such as brackets, intake boxes, and jigs for piping, as seen in this project. This jig will work for each of our axleback exhausts, as they all need to fit within specific dimensions to be direct-fit with our Mustang. After the waterjet finished the jig, we could begin fabricating our axlebacks.

Creating the jig for our 2015 Mustang axleback exhaust
Creating the jig for our 2015 Mustang axleback exhaust
Fabricating our 2015 Mustang axleback exhaust
Fabricating our 2015 Mustang axleback exhaust

Our prototypes were now complete, thanks to the quick work of the jig and Mike, our resident welder. The next step was to test-fit them on our Mustang. We will be testing the straight-pipe and small-muffler options first. Check them out below.

2015 Mustang axleback exhaust prototypes
2015 Mustang axleback exhaust prototypes
2015 Mustang axleback exhaust prototypes
2015 Mustang axleback exhaust prototypes

The rear section of the GT’s exhaust is one piece, so some cutting will be required to install these axlebacks. TeamGT was careful to slice the exhaust just right in preparation to test fit our prototypes.

Cutting the stock 2015 Mustang GT exhaust
Cutting the stock 2015 Mustang GT exhaust

We are happy to report that all of our prototypes had excellent fitment. Check out some photos of our straight-pipe and small-muffler options below.

Test fitting our 2015 Mustang GT exhaust
Test fitting our 2015 Mustang GT exhaust
Prototype 2015 Mustang GT exhaust with straight pipes
Prototype 2015 Mustang GT exhaust with straight pipes
Prototype 2015 Mustang GT exhaust with small mufflers
Prototype 2015 Mustang GT exhaust with small mufflers
Prototype 2015 Mustang GT exhaust with polished tips
Prototype 2015 Mustang GT exhaust with polished tips

Coming up!

Now that we are sure of fitment, it is on to testing. We will be sound testing all three exhaust options on our GT for your listening pleasure, so stay tuned! In the meantime, sound off in the comments below to let us know what you think.

Thanks for reading!

-Sara

Conquering the Catch Can: Nissan Titan XD Baffled Oil Catch Can, Part 1

Here at Mishimoto, we know the importance of a good catch can as far as preventative maintenance goes. For most vehicles, installing a catch can means protecting your engine from the silent monster that is blow-by. Blow by can consist of excess oil, fuel, moisture, and pure evil. Engines with direct-injection, like our good friend the Titan XD, are prone to blow-by creeping its way back into the engine through the intake, and caking debris on valves which can be very harmful to an engine over time.

Stock Titan XD engine bay
Stock Titan XD engine bay

Not to worry gentle Titan, we are here to help. Our engineers usually start with a catch can on most project vehicles as we want to protect our newest investment. For the Titan, this proved to be more difficult than we had originally thought. We began as many stories do, with a bracket. Our lead engineer, Dan, decided on a location for our first prototype, then set out to fabricate it.

Dan welding the Titan XD catch can bracket
Dan welding the Titan XD catch can bracket

A few tweaks later and we had the bracket mounted up and ready for the catch can itself. We decided to start with one of our previous catch can designs and modify it to accommodate our Cummins. We knew this catch can would need some tweaking, especially in the filter department, as diesel engines have been known to react poorly with a restrictive filter on a PCV system than others would.

Prototype Titan XD catch can installed
Prototype Titan XD catch can installed
Prototype Titan XD catch can installed
Prototype Titan XD catch can installed

First Round of Testing

We had a hunch this project was going to be a challenge, and our suspicions were confirmed as soon as we rolled out of the garage to begin testing. Our Titan decided to throw a tantrum and ended up in limp mode prompting us to return to home base so we could further evaluate our first prototype. Not to worry Titan, TeamMishi is up to the challenge. The team has several ideas about the cause of limp mode and are eager to design a second prototype that will play well with this Cummins.

Coming Up!

Would the Titan XD be consumed by its nemesis blow-by? Or would TeamMishi swoop in, just in the nick of time to save the valves? Tune in to our next post to find out!

Thanks for Reading!

Sara

Cool Air for the EcoBoost. F-150 Intercooler R&D, Part 6: Pipe Fabrication

Along with creating an awesome intercooler for the EcoBoost (EB), we also want to improve upon the pathways through which air travels to and from the charge air cooler. This will involve replacing factory components that route from the turbocharger to the intercooler and from the intercooler to the throttle body with engineered aluminum pieces.

Factory Ford F-150 EcoBoost Intercooler Piping

The factory piping setup on the F-150 is essentially a rat’s nest of molded plastic and rubber couplers that, evident upon removal, is complemented by an internal coating of oil. No wonder catch cans are so popular for these trucks!

Our engineers felt like teenagers again with all of the oil on their skin as they removed the piping in order to inspect each piece, keeping in mind that they would need to replicate all connection points to ensure that our piping is a bolt-on setup.

Check out the cold-side pipe, below.

Factory F-150 intercooler piping
Factory F-150 intercooler piping

This pipe routes from the single intercooler outlet up to the throttle body. At the intercooler connection, Ford uses a quick-disconnect fitting, which we examined (and didn’t break!) when we looked at our intercooler design.

Factory F-150 intercooler piping
Factory F-150 intercooler piping

The side of the pipe with the throttle body connection is a bit more interesting; this segment incorporates a pressure sensor as well as a nipple for the crank-case ventilation system. The connection between the engine and the pipe uses a more standard coupler, but the benefit is that it provides a flex point as the engine moves during acceleration and other high-torque conditions – this keeps the hose from being prematurely worn throughout the life of the vehicle.

Factory F-150 intercooler piping
Factory F-150 intercooler piping

The twin-turbo setup on the EcoBoost makes for a pretty extensive maze of piping. The hot-side pipes, like the cold-side pipes, are also molded plastic, but they use coupler connections on each end. I have included a photo of one below for your viewing pleasure.

Factory Ford F-150 EcoBoost intercooler pipe
Factory Ford F-150 EcoBoost intercooler pipe

Factory Piping Data Collection

We used our ROMER arm to help up map out the piping. A ROMER arm provides an easy way to capture accurate dimensions for factory components by allowing us to fix components in place in order to map out their coordinates in three-dimensional space. This helps to facilitate building a model on the computer, and ensures that our measurements are as true as possible.

Factory Ford F-150 EcoBoost intercooler pipe
Factory Ford F-150 EcoBoost intercooler pipe
Factory Ford F-150 EcoBoost intercooler pipe
Factory Ford F-150 EcoBoost intercooler pipe

Coming Up – Prototype Fabrication

It’s hard to beat the smell of burning metal and the distant buzz of AC welding! Check back next time for a look at the fabrication of our prototype piping kit.

Thanks

-John

Tell Her About Them – 2016 Camaro SS Exhaust R&D, Part 3: Axleback Options

Our Mishimoto chefs have been very busy in our R&D kitchen, cooking up some wonderful 2016 Camaro exhaust prototypes with our 3D-modeling CAD software. Using nothing short of the finest ingredients, they have created a suite of 2016 Camaro SS exhaust options that are so delicious, Guy Fieri’s mouth would surely be watering at the sight – though I’m sure he’d be even more tantalized if these were compatible with the first-gen Camaro!

Jiro Dreams of Mishi

We have decided to release five different 2016 Camaro exhaust systems, and we think they should satisfy just about anyone with an SS and a hunger for some killer sound. As we determined in our previous post, the crimped section upstream of the axle-back does not have an impact on power output, but it does make the system sound more refined. We will be retaining that section for sound and OEM functionality, but our axle-backs will replace the stock piping beginning just in front of the second hanger from the rear. The stock 2016 Camaro exhaust must be cut in order to install the Mishimoto exhaust, because the OEM system is one single piece from the header to the tips (thanks, GM!). That said, there is no need to fret, because our axle-backs neck down to the OEM diameter and will fit securely attached with our clamping hardware.

My good friend Anthony Bourdain mentioned to me the other day that we’re in the running for at least two Michelin stars, but I bet you guys will give us three once you get a taste of these systems.

Let’s take a peek at what’s on the menu!

Dual-Mode (or NPP, for those who speak GM)

2016 Camaro Exhaust
2016 Camaro Exhaust

Our first special is our NPP axle-back. (If “NPP” and “dual-mode” mean nothing to you, here is an explanation.) That’s right people – we will be retaining full dual-mode functionality in this variant. This 2016 Camaro SS exhaust system includes custom valves, engineered right here in Delaware, that have been incorporated into the tip section in a way not unlike the stock setup. As such, the stock actuators simply swap right over to our new valves. Function is exactly the same as with the stock 2016 Camaro exhaust, although both modes will sound even better than before. In tour mode, the LT1’s snarl will remain somewhat contained so that you don’t need to worry about your rudely awakened neighbors angrily pulling out their steak knives whenever you leave for work. But race mode, of course, will scream. (We’re giving Gordon Ramsey a run for his money!)

Non-NPP Options

For those of you who opted to order your Camaro without the dual-mode option, we’ve got something to satiate any of your tastes. This axle-back will be available in your choice of two volume levels, but perhaps even more exciting is that both of those options will be available as a dual-tipped system or a quad-tipped system. This will allow non-NPP owners to use quad tips to achieve an aggressive, flush aesthetic by swapping out the rear bumper valence with one that has larger exhaust cutouts; this could be an NPP rear valence or an aftermarket bumper (or something custom for any innovators out there).

If you have a more refined, moderate palate, our first 2016 Camaro exhaust system is designed to be a bit more civilized. Don’t worry, we threw in a pinch of aggression too, but this system will keep the loudness low relative to some of your other options. Here are some 3D models of that system, with dual and quad tips respectively.

Moderate Non-NPP System, Dual Tip
2016 Camaro SS Exhaust
2016 Camaro SS Exhaust
Moderate Non-NPP System, Quad Tip
2016 Camaro Exhaust
2016 Camaro Exhaust

Of course, for those of you* who live for the rush of always looking over your shoulder in fear of cranky, steak knife-wielding neighbors, we will be offering an aggressive system that is sure to have every window pane in your neighborhood buzzing in anticipation.

This system features a light touch of acoustic tuning from a resonator, but it is not muffled and will certainly be a hit among anyone who wants to unleash the true, boisterous sound of GM’s latest V8. Check out some shots below!

 

*I would put myself squarely in this category.

Aggressive Non-NPP System, Dual Tip
2016 Camaro SS Exhaust
2016 Camaro SS Exhaust
Aggressive Non-NPP System, Quad Tip
2016 Camaro Exhaust
2016 Camaro Exhaust

Time for Dessert…

And now for the icing on the cake (this culinary metaphor is getting tired, I know). We will be offering every one of the aforementioned 2016 Camaro exhaust options with your choice of flat black or polished tips! The lead engineer on this project, Steve, spent a great deal of time designing the tips, and they look exquisite! You’ll see what I mean in a future post.

Coming Soon…

We will go into more detail with some finer photos of this 2016 Camaro SS exhaust, more info on the tips, and eventually, some sound bites (ha!).

 

Until then,
-Gardiner

We’re Working on a Cooler Coyote: Mishimoto’s Mustang GT Oil Cooler R&D Part 3, Prototype Fabrication

In our last post, we took a look at the fabrication of our oil cooler bracket and the prototype heat exchanger. We’ve settled on the final bracket design, and now we are moving on to the heat exchanger.

Heat Exchanger Fabrication

The lead engineer on this project, Dan, plans to test several designs, including an all new heat exchanger design for this project. Exciting stuff! Before we test, we first need to fabricate our test subjects with the help of our expert welder, Mike. We will be creating a small cross-flow oil cooler, a large cross-flow oil cooler, a small dual-pass oil cooler, and a large dual-pass oil cooler.

We began with the cores of our new oil cooler designs. First up was welding the mounting points to the top edges of our cores. We have a pretty cool mounting design for our oil cooler, and we were pretty excited to see it come together.

Test-fitting the Mustang oil cooler
Test-fitting the Mustang oil cooler
Test-fitting Mustang parts
Test-fitting Mustang parts

After fitment was confirmed on our GT, Mike began welding the end tanks onto our oil coolers. We have two types of end tanks which will join with the cores to become the two different style coolers; dual-pass and cross-flow. Dan will be testing both styles to determine which is the better option to cool our Coyote.

Fabricating Mustang parts
Fabricating Mustang parts
Mustang oil cooler prototypes
Mustang oil cooler prototypes
Mustang oil cooler prototypes
Mustang oil cooler prototypes
Mustang Parts Prototypes
Mustang Parts Prototypes

After our functional prototypes were completed, it was time to test them for leaks and fit them on the GT. Our leak test method uses a very scientific soap-and-water concoction combined with several spotters looking for bubbles.

Leak testing Mustang oil cooler prototypes
Leak testing Mustang oil cooler prototypes

Once we were sure that our prototypes were impenetrable fortresses of cooling, we introduced them to the GT.

Large Mustang oil cooler prototype installed
Large Mustang oil cooler prototype installed

Both the small and large prototypes fit to our standards and meet our objectives, which included leaving as much room as possible for installing aftermarket heat exchangers behind our oil cooler. To free up as much room as possible, we have aligned the back of our oil cooler with the wiring harness that runs along the crash beam. Take a look at the space we saved the in the next photo, shot from beneath the GT. The arrow indicates the backside of our oil cooler and how it ends evenly with the wiring harness to maximize the space between our cooler and the A/C condenser.

Oil cooler clearance with Mustang parts
Oil cooler clearance with Mustang parts

Coming Up!

Time for testing! We will be posting the results of our testing as well as the final oil cooler design, so stay tuned. In the meantime, sound off in the comments below and let us know what you think.

Thanks for reading!

-Sara

An inside look at the engineering of Mishimoto products.

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