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Mishimoto 2015 Mustang EcoBoost Video Review Series, Part 2: Dyno Pulls

Check out a few of our initial dyno pulls with our new 2015 EcoBoost Mustang!

The plot is shown below!

2015 EcoBoost Mustang Dyno Plot
2015 EcoBoost Mustang Dyno Plot

Yes, these numbers appear to be a bit low. Unfortunately we are not sure what fuel grade the dealership filled our car with! Once we empty the tank we will be filling it with some fresh 93 octane and collecting data on a few more pulls!

Thanks for taking a look!

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Mishimoto E36 radiator end tank

Mishimoto BMW E30/E36 X-Line Radiator, Part 4: Cooling Efficiency Results

The testing results are in! First, a quick comparison of the fluid capacity improvements the Mishimoto X-line radiator provides.

Stock Radiator Capacity: 0.6 gal (2.27L)

Mishimoto X-Line Radiator Capacity: 1.15 gal (4.35L)

This is an increase in capacity of 91%! This additional fluid, combined with our highly efficient core design, should easily produce great gains in cooling efficiency. Let’s evaluate our charts obtained from the testing data. First up, our raw temperature data from both rounds of testing.

Stock radiator testing data
Stock radiator testing data

The stock radiator is reasonably efficient, being more than adequate for normal street use and occasional track use. Extended track use, however, could present some issues. Our stock testing showed average inlet temperatures around 212°F (100˚C) and average outlet temperatures around 160°F (71˚C).

Stock Radiator

Inlet Temperatures: 212°F (100˚C)

Outlet Temperatures: 160°F (71˚C)

Now, let’s see how the Mishimoto radiator performed under nearly identical conditions.

Mishimoto radiator testing data
Mishimoto radiator testing data

As you can see, the Mishimoto radiator outperformed the stock unit significantly! Inlet temperatures hover right around 209°F (98˚C) and are very similar to those of the stock unit. The big change is in the area we wanted to see, which is in the outlet temperatures. Recorded radiator outlet temperatures average around 130°F (55˚C)! This is a huge decrease compared to the stock radiator.

Mishimoto Radiator

Inlet Temperatures: 209°F (98˚C)

Outlet Temperatures: 130°F (55˚C)

Next, for an easy comparison, we created a chart showing both the stock and Mishimoto radiator outlet temperatures.

Outlet temperature comparison
Outlet temperature comparison

This chart depicts our temperature decreases of up to 30°F [16˚C] compared to the stock radiator. Our last chart, the comparison of radiator efficiency, is the most important for our testing purposes.

Radiator efficiency comparison
Radiator efficiency comparison

For this chart, we used the inlet and outlet temperatures during testing to calculate the core efficiency. Knowing that our radiator provided lower outlet temperatures, we knew that our efficiencies would be much better than the stock compared to the stock radiator unit, the Mishimoto radiator is, on average, 20% more efficient at transferring heat. These are the gains we wanted to see during our testing. Success!

Now that we had a great-fitting product that performed to our standards, it was time to recap our goals to ensure this product was what our customers wanted.

Project Objectives

  1. Core must be as thick as possible while still retaining the stock mechanical fan.

Our engineering team designed this radiator with a 57mm core (23mm thicker than stock), which provides improved fluid capacity and improved heat transfer, yet still retains functionality with the stock mechanical fan. We tested this product to ensure all clearances were safe for extended use.

  1. Must be a direct fit for the 88-99 BMW E30/E36 vehicles with 6-cylinder engines.

This product features all critical dimensions and components with the stock radiator. We test fit this radiator as well, to ensure our data were accurate. All factory components bolt to this radiator just as they do with the stock radiator.

  1. Must provide proven temperature benefits compared to the stock radiator.

The Mishimoto radiator provided a 30°F (16˚C) drop in radiator outlet temperatures compared to the stock unit. This temperature drop translates to a 20% improvement in radiator efficiency with the Mishimoto radiator.

  1. Incorporate dense core composition for improved heat transfer

Our engineers designed an extremely dense core with a large increase in fin surface area, which provides greater heat transfer resulting in substantial cooling benefits.

That’s it, another successful project in the books. We now have a completed product, ready for mass production. We do intend to offer this radiator as a group buy for those interested, so stay tuned for this.

We leave you with a quick dyno video featuring the M3 we used during testing. This particular pull was conducted to test the effect of mechanical fan removal on power output. We will have more details on the test when we post our build thread for our electric fan conversion kit for the E36.

Thanks for reading!

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Mishimoto 2015 Mustang EcoBoost Video Review Series, Part 1: Intro

Hey guys,

As you saw in our post from yesterday, and our threads on the forums, we acquired our 2015 Ford Mustang EcoBoost today!

Check out the video and gallery below showing the delivery of our new 2015 Mustang, and an explanation of our plans for the next few weeks!

Thanks for reading, check back with us Monday for a dyno video!

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Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler installed

Mishimoto 2010–2012 Dodge 6.7L Cummins Intercooler, Part 3: Prototype Intercooler Evaluation and Installation

Our prototype intercooler is ready to go! Let’s take a quick peek at what our engineers designed!

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler prototype
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler prototype
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler prototype
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler prototype

First impressions, this cooler is massive compared to the factory unit. Our engineers weren’t kidding when they mentioned that the size increase would be significant. You will notice two dimples on the intercooler outlet. They are predefined spots for injection systems such as methanol, or for a temperature/boost pressure sensor. These bungs are not predrilled, but they provide extra material thickness for those who wish to drill and tap the port. Pretty slick! You can also see from these images that our core is a solid bar-and-plate design. Now, let’s compare the core thickness of the factory intercooler to the Mishimoto unit.

Factory 6.7L Cummins intercooler thickness
Factory 6.7L Cummins intercooler thickness
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler thickness
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler thickness

Yes, you are seeing that correctly; the Mishimoto intercooler core is twice as thick as the factory intercooler. Check out a few shots of the prototype in raw aluminum form before we painted it for video use.

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins raw intercooler prototype
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins raw intercooler prototype
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins raw intercooler prototype
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins raw intercooler prototype

Not only is the core significantly enlarged, but we’ve also increased the size of the inlet and outlet, which should provide a nice improvement in airflow. We are including adapter boots that allow you to mate this cooler to the factory piping.

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins raw intercooler prototype inlet
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins raw intercooler prototype inlet

Now it was time to install this prototype to check for any fitment concerns. On this same day, we were test fitting our aluminum radiator prototype as well. Check out a few shots of the radiator installed!

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins aluminum radiator installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins aluminum radiator installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins aluminum radiator installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins aluminum radiator installed

We will be starting a build thread for this radiator very soon, so be sure to check out that one as well.

Next, we installed the Mishimoto prototype intercooler. Check out a few shots of this installed unit.

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler installed

This cooler looks massive even after being installed on the truck. So far, all our mounting points were lining up perfectly. Our end tanks slid through the radiator core support just like the factory unit did. Next up, we installed the AC condenser/transmission cooler unit into place.

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler branding
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins intercooler branding

The last image shows our branding/logo placed on the driver’s side end tank. On our recent products, we have been placing our brand in discreet locations so as to keep our products looking like OEM.

The condenser unit also fit perfectly with the mounting points on the intercooler. We reassembled the front end of the truck to ensure that none of the body components touched the larger Mishimoto cooler. Next time, we will be hooking up our data-collection sensors and making some dyno pulls to see how this cooler performed!

Thanks for reading!

4 thoughts on “Mishimoto 2010–2012 Dodge 6.7L Cummins Intercooler, Part 3: Prototype Intercooler Evaluation and Installation”

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Mishimoto GR STI on the dyno

Mishimoto Subaru WRX/STI FMIC Kit, Part 7: Cooler Efficiency Testing

We are nearing the end of this build. As mentioned in the last post, we wanted to put our core to the test and provide some cooling efficiency data that our customers could use. We decided to modify our 2010 STi to add some heat and power to the CAC system for testing. Information regarding our vehicle is listed below.

2010 Subaru WRX STI

  • 6-Speed Manual
  • Mishimoto Intake
  • Mishimoto Front-Mount Intercooler
  • Fuel Line Modification
  • 3” Downpipe
  • Tune

Check out a few shots of the car on the dyno!

Mishimoto GR STI on the dyno
Mishimoto GR STI on the dyno
Mishimoto GR STI on the dyno
Mishimoto GR STI on the dyno

As you can see, we have sensors installed on the piping, both the cold- and hot-side of the intercooler. We have pressure and temperature sensors hooked up for logging. We are hoping to capture data on any pressure losses across the core, as well as any temperature reduction we see through the cooler. Check out a close-up shot of the sensors.

Temperature and pressure sensors for testing
Temperature and pressure sensors for testing
Temperature and pressure sensors for testing
Temperature and pressure sensors for testing

Check out a quick video showing a walk around, as well as a few dyno pulls with our completed front-mount intercooler setup!

That’s it for this post! Check back in a few days for the results from our testing and a quick recap of the project!

Thanks for reading!

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An inside look at the engineering of Mishimoto products.

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