Mishimoto GR STI on the dyno

Mishimoto Subaru WRX/STi FMIC Kit, Part 8: Testing Data Presentation and Project Recap

Time to review our data so we can finally put a close on this project. The product development process for this front-mount intercooler has taken months and has also helped refine several of our processes. Before we move into the testing data, our first portion of this post will cover the physical benefits of our intercooler. By providing a more efficient heat exchanger, we can ensure that higher-powered vehicles are not being hindered by debilitating heat-soak and/or inefficiencies with the use of a top-mount intercooler setup.

Our first comparison point is internal flow area. This graph shows the volume of the actual air passages through the intercooler.

Comparison of internal flow area
Comparison of internal flow area

Internal flow area has a direct effect on both heat transfer and power support: Greater volume results in more heat transfer, which results in lower intake temperatures and a much “happier” engine.

The chart above shows the comparison of the area of three coolers: the stock 2010 STI top-mount intercooler, the Mishimoto 2008–2014 top-mount intercooler, and the Mishimoto front-mount intercooler. As you can see from the chart, the front-mount intercooler is much larger than essentially any top-mount cooler on the market. Our front-mount cooler provides a 73% increase in internal flow area compared to the stock intercooler. This increase in area will be invaluable to those who are modifying their engines, running high boost pressures, and/or subjecting their vehicles to repeated high-rpm pulls.

Next up is a comparison of actual core volume. Core volume is a measure of the entirety of the core, which includes the air passages, bars, tubes, fins, etc. As with Internal flow area, this chart shows benefits which have a similar effect on heat transfer. Once again, a higher volume is going to provide huge benefits for those folks with modified vehicles.

Comparison of core volume
Comparison of core volume

Once again, the Mishimoto front-mount intercooler provided huge gains over the top-mount setup. This time, we saw increases of 124% compared to the stock top-mount cooler.

You may be thinking that these two products are for completely different customers, so why compare them? Great point! This data is being provided for those enthusiasts making enough power to necessitate/consider upgrading to a front-mount setup. If you are on the fence about converting, these graphs provide information regarding the benefits you can expect from the upgrade.

Our final physical attribute the fins on the intercooler. As mentioned earlier in this post, fins are connected to the air passages and work to transfer heat from the internal air to the air passing through the core. The greater the fin area, the more heat transfer is possible. Our team has positioned this cooler in the front of the bumper to obtain optimal airflow for maximum temperature reduction. Check out the comparison of air surface areas in the chart below.

Comparison of air surface area
Comparison of air surface area

Once again, we saw impressive gains compared to the stock intercooler; this time the magic number is 91%!

Now that these comparisons are complete, we can move to our actual testing and data collection. Check out the testing conditions shown below.

Vehicle Information

  • 2010 Subaru WRX STI
  • 6-Speed Manual Transmission
  • Mishimoto Intake
  • Mishimoto Front-Mount Intercooler
  • Fuel Line Modification
  • 3” Downpipe
  • Tune

Testing Conditions

Ambient Temperature: 66°F–68°F

Humidity: 30%

Sensors: PLX Sensor modules, temperature and pressure sensors

Data: Data was averaged once three consistent pulls were obtained.

Our team then finalized the tune we had on the vehicle, strapped it to the dyno, and began making pulls!

2010 STI tuning
2010 STI tuning
2010 STI on the dyno
2010 STI on the dyno

After a day of dyno pulls, we finally had the Iwe needed to evaluate the intercooler we designed for our front-mount kits! First, take a look at the power our STi is putting to the ground!

Mishimoto 2010 STI dyno plot
Mishimoto 2010 STI dyno plot

With just the basic modifications listed above, we are making huge power gains (especially in torque) compared to the vehicle when it was stock. The increased boost pressure should also have an impact on our intake temperature testing.

Now, check out the chart showing inlet and outlet temperature data recorded during our dyno pulls!

Mishimoto 2010 STI intake temperature results
Mishimoto 2010 STI intake temperature results

So this is the data we have been waiting for since the inception of this project, and we are very pleased with the results. This data is graphed to show the increases in temperature (inlet and outlet) relative to boost pressure during our pulls. This is graphed over a full pull through the rpm range with boost peaking around 19 psi and tapering to 15 psi. At the start of the pull, we see drops around 40°F from the inlet to the outlet, placing temperatures within 15 degrees of ambient air. As the pull progresses, our drops increase to over 130°F. So what does this mean for you? Check out our efficiency chart for a better look at the benefits of this cooler.

Mishimoto 2010 STI intercooler efficiency
Mishimoto 2010 STI intercooler efficiency

Efficiency is where our intercooler data really shows its worth. We obtained 70%–85% efficiency throughout our pull! These are fantastic numbers for a front-mount setup. As a comparison, from our previous tests, we have shown that the stock intercooler provides around 60% efficiency on our completely stock 2010 STI. Unfortunately we did not collect efficiency information on the stock TMIC on our STI after we installed the modifications used for this test. We can assume that it will be far less than the 60% shown on the testing of the stock vehicle.

So, that makes this project a complete success. We have developed a direct-fit front-mount intercooler setup that provides extremely efficient drops in intake temperatures and is designed to support vehicles with substantial horsepower and boost pressures.

Now that we were finished with development and testing, it was time to review our goals and ensure our final product meets or exceeds them.

Project Goals

  1. Develop a bolt-on kit for fitment on all generations of the WRX/STi. This includes vehicles from 2002­–2014. Our 2015 kits will be different, and we will have a build thread for those at a later date.

Our engineering team has successfully designed a completely bolt-on front-mount intercooler kit for the 2002–2014 WRX and STI. Each kit we offer is designed specifically for that particular year-range and includes all piping, couplers, hardware, etc. for installation.

  1. Attempt to use one intercooler design for all chassis.

As shown in the posts above, we designed and fully test fit our intercooler unit on each of the chassis from 2002 to 2014. Although minor trimming is required to the rear of the bumper, this unit fits very well and looks fantastic!

  1. Provide all piping necessary for installation.

As mentioned above, these kits are all-inclusive and completely direct fit. We include all piping necessary for installation as well as couplers, mounting hardware, intercooler, and our replacement bumper beam.

  1. Test product to ensure intercooler efficiency.

Our team fully tested the efficiency of this intercooler core and proved an efficiency average of 80% on a 318 whp/340 wtq running 19 psi of boost pressure. We anticipate huge gains for vehicles up to 600 whp.

That’s it! Thank you very much for following the development process for our front-mount intercooler kit. Feel free to follow-up with any questions or comments!

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Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed

Mishimoto 2010–2012 Dodge 6.7L Cummins Performance Aluminum Radiator, Part 3: Prototype Installation

Time to install our prototype radiator into a test vehicle to make sure that it fits perfectly. Luckily, we were able to check fitment on the same donor vehicle we used for our last round of testing. Once the truck rolled into the shop, we quickly installed our prototype radiator shown at the end of our last post. Check out a few shots taken during the installation process!

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed

Once we confirmed that the primary radiator mounting points fit perfectly, we installed the shrouding for the top of the radiator as well as the mechanical fan and shroud. As with any test fit, we checked critical clearances to ensure that hoses and electrical components do not come in contact with the radiator or shroud. We also checked fan-to-radiator core clearance to be sure we had ample space for engine movement.

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed with shroud
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed with shroud
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed with mechanical fan shroud
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed with mechanical fan shroud
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed with mechanical fan shroud
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed with mechanical fan shroud

Finally, we could attach the radiator hoses, fill the vehicle with coolant, and fire up the engine to bleed the air from the cooling system.

Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed with silicone radiator hoses
Mishimoto 6.7L Cummins radiator prototype installed with silicone radiator hoses

This test fit was successful in that all components fit together just like the factory radiator, and no adjustments of our product design were necessary. Check back with us next time for an evaluation of the physical benefits of our design and an explanation of our testing plans and process.

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Mishimoto 2015 Mustang EcoBoost Video Review Series, Part 2: Dyno Pulls

Check out a few of our initial dyno pulls with our new 2015 EcoBoost Mustang!

The plot is shown below!

2015 EcoBoost Mustang Dyno Plot
2015 EcoBoost Mustang Dyno Plot

Yes, these numbers appear to be a bit low. Unfortunately we are not sure what fuel grade the dealership filled our car with! Once we empty the tank we will be filling it with some fresh 93 octane and collecting data on a few more pulls!

Thanks for taking a look!

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Mishimoto E36 radiator end tank

Mishimoto BMW E30/E36 X-Line Radiator, Part 4: Cooling Efficiency Results

The testing results are in! First, a quick comparison of the fluid capacity improvements the Mishimoto X-line radiator provides.

Stock Radiator Capacity: 0.6 gal (2.27L)

Mishimoto X-Line Radiator Capacity: 1.15 gal (4.35L)

This is an increase in capacity of 91%! This additional fluid, combined with our highly efficient core design, should easily produce great gains in cooling efficiency. Let’s evaluate our charts obtained from the testing data. First up, our raw temperature data from both rounds of testing.

Stock radiator testing data
Stock radiator testing data

The stock radiator is reasonably efficient, being more than adequate for normal street use and occasional track use. Extended track use, however, could present some issues. Our stock testing showed average inlet temperatures around 212°F (100˚C) and average outlet temperatures around 160°F (71˚C).

Stock Radiator

Inlet Temperatures: 212°F (100˚C)

Outlet Temperatures: 160°F (71˚C)

Now, let’s see how the Mishimoto radiator performed under nearly identical conditions.

Mishimoto radiator testing data
Mishimoto radiator testing data

As you can see, the Mishimoto radiator outperformed the stock unit significantly! Inlet temperatures hover right around 209°F (98˚C) and are very similar to those of the stock unit. The big change is in the area we wanted to see, which is in the outlet temperatures. Recorded radiator outlet temperatures average around 130°F (55˚C)! This is a huge decrease compared to the stock radiator.

Mishimoto Radiator

Inlet Temperatures: 209°F (98˚C)

Outlet Temperatures: 130°F (55˚C)

Next, for an easy comparison, we created a chart showing both the stock and Mishimoto radiator outlet temperatures.

Outlet temperature comparison
Outlet temperature comparison

This chart depicts our temperature decreases of up to 30°F [16˚C] compared to the stock radiator. Our last chart, the comparison of radiator efficiency, is the most important for our testing purposes.

Radiator efficiency comparison
Radiator efficiency comparison

For this chart, we used the inlet and outlet temperatures during testing to calculate the core efficiency. Knowing that our radiator provided lower outlet temperatures, we knew that our efficiencies would be much better than the stock compared to the stock radiator unit, the Mishimoto radiator is, on average, 20% more efficient at transferring heat. These are the gains we wanted to see during our testing. Success!

Now that we had a great-fitting product that performed to our standards, it was time to recap our goals to ensure this product was what our customers wanted.

Project Objectives

  1. Core must be as thick as possible while still retaining the stock mechanical fan.

Our engineering team designed this radiator with a 57mm core (23mm thicker than stock), which provides improved fluid capacity and improved heat transfer, yet still retains functionality with the stock mechanical fan. We tested this product to ensure all clearances were safe for extended use.

  1. Must be a direct fit for the 88-99 BMW E30/E36 vehicles with 6-cylinder engines.

This product features all critical dimensions and components with the stock radiator. We test fit this radiator as well, to ensure our data were accurate. All factory components bolt to this radiator just as they do with the stock radiator.

  1. Must provide proven temperature benefits compared to the stock radiator.

The Mishimoto radiator provided a 30°F (16˚C) drop in radiator outlet temperatures compared to the stock unit. This temperature drop translates to a 20% improvement in radiator efficiency with the Mishimoto radiator.

  1. Incorporate dense core composition for improved heat transfer

Our engineers designed an extremely dense core with a large increase in fin surface area, which provides greater heat transfer resulting in substantial cooling benefits.

That’s it, another successful project in the books. We now have a completed product, ready for mass production. We do intend to offer this radiator as a group buy for those interested, so stay tuned for this.

We leave you with a quick dyno video featuring the M3 we used during testing. This particular pull was conducted to test the effect of mechanical fan removal on power output. We will have more details on the test when we post our build thread for our electric fan conversion kit for the E36.

Thanks for reading!

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Mishimoto 2015 Mustang EcoBoost Video Review Series, Part 1: Intro

Hey guys,

As you saw in our post from yesterday, and our threads on the forums, we acquired our 2015 Ford Mustang EcoBoost today!

Check out the video and gallery below showing the delivery of our new 2015 Mustang, and an explanation of our plans for the next few weeks!

Thanks for reading, check back with us Monday for a dyno video!

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An inside look at the engineering of Mishimoto products.

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